124th U.S. Open

Pinehurst No. 2



Golf Digest Logo 2024 season

Our new ranking of every PGA Tour course—from best to worst

There are plenty of reasons why a course is selected to host a PGA Tour event beyond its architectural merits. Of course, the layout must sufficiently test the best players in the world, but the regional market, logistics and history all play important roles in landing a tour event as well.

That said, it’s no secret the tour travels to many of our country’s finest courses. Of the 32 events played in the United States during the 2024 PGA Tour season, 16 are currently ranked on at least one of Golf Digest's national rankings—America's 100 Greatest, Second 100 Greatest and 100 Greatest Public.

In this guide, we rank the 32 U.S. courses that will host a PGA Tour event or major championship this season, based on the scores from our 1,800 course-ranking panelists. (This list only includes events played in the U.S.—there are five international events scheduled this season. Also note that we only rank the primary course at multi-course events such as Torrey Pines and Pebble Beach.)

You might be surprised how the architectural merits of a layout don’t always align with the prestige of the tour event played there. Our panelists evaluate courses on seven scoring criteria, ranging from Shot Options and Layout Variety to Conditioning and Aesthetics.

Scroll on for the complete ranking, and be sure to click through to each individual course page for bonus photography and reviews from our course panelists. We also encourage you to leave your own ratings on the courses you’ve played … so you can make your case for why a course should be higher or lower on our rankings.

1. Augusta National Golf Club (Masters Tournament)

Augusta National Golf Club
Private
Augusta National Golf Club
Augusta, GA, United States
5
94 Panelists

There will be no surprise with the No. 1 course on this list. Augusta National has been ranked first, second or third on our biennial America's 100 Greatest Courses ranking in each edition.

The club made a significant change in the fall of 2022, lengthening the par-5 13th hole by about 30 yards. No club has tinkered with its golf course as often or as effectively over the decades as has Augusta National Golf Club, mainly to keep it competitive for the annual Masters Tournament, an event it has conducted since 1934, with time off during WWII. All that tinkering has resulted in an amalgamation of design ideas, with a routing by Alister Mackenzie and Bobby Jones, some Perry Maxwell greens, some Trent Jones water hazards, some Jack Nicklaus mounds and swales and, most recently, extensive rebunkering and tree planting by Tom Fazio. The tinkering continued in the summer of 2018 as the club lengthened the par-4 fifth by extending its back tee on newly acquired land. Soon to come, the lengthening of the famed par-5 13th.

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2. Pebble Beach Golf Links (AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am)

Pebble Beach Golf Links
Public
Pebble Beach Golf Links
Pebble Beach, CA, United States
Not just the greatest meeting of land and sea in American golf, but the most extensive one, too, with nine holes perched immediately above the crashing Pacific surf—the fourth through 10th plus the 17th and 18th. Pebble’s sixth through eighth are golf’s real Amen Corner, with a few Hail Marys thrown in over an ocean cove on the eighth from atop a 75-foot-high bluff. Pebble hosted a successful U.S. Amateur in 2018 and a sixth U.S. Open in 2019. Recent improvements include the redesign of the once-treacherous 14th green, and reshaping of the par-3 17th green, both planned by Arnold Palmer’s Design Company a few years back—and the current changes to the iconic eighth hole. Pebble Beach hosted the Women's U.S. Open for the first time in 2023.
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Editor's Note: Courses such as Spyglass Hill, which are not the main host courses of tour, were not included in this list. Read our experts' reviews of Spyglass Hill here.

3. Muirfield Village Golf Club (The Memorial Tournament)

Muirfield Village Golf Club
Private
Muirfield Village Golf Club
Dublin, OH, United States
4.9
172 Panelists
This is the course that Jack built, and rebuilt, and rebuilt again and again. Since its opening in 1974, Jack Nicklaus has remodeled every hole at Muirfield Village, some more than once, using play at the PGA Tour’s annual Memorial Tournament for some guidance. The most recent renovation in 2020 was one of the most extensive and included the rebuilding of every hole, the shifting of greens and tees, strategic changes to the iconic par 5s and a new, more player-friendly par3 16th. That’s how a championship course remains competitive. But with every change, Nicklaus always made sure the general membership could still play and enjoy the course as well. The latest word is that Nicklaus is still not happy with the 16th hole and has plans for yet another version.
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4. The Riviera Country Club (The Genesis Invitational)

Riviera Country Club
Private
Riviera Country Club
Pacific Palisades, CA, United States
4.8
198 Panelists
A compact and shrewd design by George C. Thomas Jr. and associate William P. Bell, Riviera features everything from a long Redan par 3 to a bunker in the middle of a green to an alternate-fairway par 4. With its 18th green at the base of a natural amphitheater, and its primary rough consisting of club-grabbing Kikuyu, Riviera seems tailor-made as a tournament venue. It hosted a PGA Championship in 1995, a U.S. Senior Open in 1998 and a U.S. Amateur in 2017, but no U.S. Open since 1948. Riviera was recently awarded the 2031 U.S. Open, and it will also host the 2028 Olympics. But it’s the site of an annual PGA Tour event, which is even better exposure to the golf world.
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5. Pinehurst No. 2 (U.S. Open)

Pinehurst No. 2
Public
Pinehurst No. 2
Pinehurst, NC, United States
In 2010, a team lead by Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw killed and ripped out all the Bermudagrass rough on Pinehurst No. 2 that had been foolishly planted in the 1970s. Between fairways and tree lines, they established vast bands of native hardpan sand dotted with clumps of wiregrass and scattered pine needles. They reduced the irrigation to mere single rows in fairways to prevent grass from ever returning to the new sandy wastelands. Playing firm and fast, it was wildly successful as the site of the 2014 Men’s and Women’s U.S. Opens, played on consecutive weeks. Because of its water reduction, the course was named a Green Star environmental award-winner by Golf Digest that year. In 2019, Pinehurst No. 2 and No. 4 hosted another U.S. Amateur Championship, and the USGA announced Pinehurst No. 2—in addition to hosting the 2024 U.S. Open—will also have the 2029, 2035, 2041 and 2047 U.S. Opens.
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6. TPC Sawgrass: Stadium (The Players Championship)

TPC Sawgrass: Stadium
Public
TPC Sawgrass: Stadium
Ponte Vedra Beach, FL
TPC’s stadium concept was the idea of then-PGA Tour commissioner Deane Beman. The 1980 design was pure Pete Dye, who set out to test the world’s best golfers by mixing demands of distance with target golf. Most greens are ringed by random lumps, bumps and hollows, what Dye calls his "grenade attack architecture." His ultimate target hole is the heart-pounding sink-or-swim island green 17th, which offers no bailout, perhaps unfairly in windy Atlantic coast conditions. The 17th has spawned over a hundred imitation island greens in the past 40 years. To make the layout even more exciting during tournament play, Steve Wenzloff of PGA Tour Design Services recently remodeled several holes, most significantly the 12th, which is now a drivable par 4.
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7. Castle Pines Golf Club (BMW Championship)

Castle Pines Golf Club
Private
Castle Pines Golf Club
Castle Rock, CO, United States
4.6
145 Panelists
When Golf Digest began its annual Best New Course awards in 1983, the review panel selected Castle Pines as the Private Course winner, but Bill Davis, co-founder of Golf Digest and founding father of all its course rankings, didn’t care for the course and vetoed its inclusion. So no private course was honored that year. Davis soon recognized his error, and in 1987—its first year of eligibility—Castle Pines joined America’s 100 Greatest and has remained there ever since. Club founder Jack Vickers, a Midwest oilman, had urged architect Jack Nicklaus to produce a mountain-venue design worthy of a major championship. Jack did, but when a championship never resulted, Vickers established his own, The International, which for many years was the only PGA Tour event played under a unique Stableford format. It’s a pity that The International is no longer on the Tour’s schedule. Like Muirfield Village, the only other solo Nicklaus design in the top 50, Castle Pines has undergone a steady procession of hole alterations to keep pace with changing technology, and changing tastes.
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8. Valhalla Golf Club (PGA Championship)

Valhalla Golf Club
Private
Valhalla Golf Club
Louisville, KY, United States
4.6
102 Panelists
Given a difficult piece of land on which to create Valhalla (half the site was floodplain, with high-tension power poles), Jack Nicklaus drew on his training under Pete Dye and Desmond Muirhead to produce a unique design, with an alternate fairway par 5, a par 4 with an island green and an 18th green shaped like a horseshoe. Over the decades, Nicklaus returned periodically to update its challenges, and the club rebuilt bunkers and replaced its soft bent grass fairways with firmer, faster zoysia in 2022. Valhalla has proven to be a great championship site. It has hosted three thrilling PGA Championships, the latest Rory McIlroy’s win in 2014, and will host a fourth in 2024.
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9. Quail Hollow Club (Wells Fargo Championship)

Quail Hollow Club
Private
Quail Hollow Club
Charlotte, NC, United States
Few golf course projects had more national attention in recent years than Quail Hollow, mainly because its front nine was redesigned just a year before it hosted the 2017 PGA Championship, won by Justin Thomas. The par-4 first and par-3 second holes were completely torn up, replaced by a new long dogleg-right par-4 opening hole. Several acres of pines to the left of the fifth tee were removed to make room for a new par-3 fourth. (With its knobby green fronted by three traps, it proved to be the most frustrating hole for pros in the 2017 PGA.) More pines were removed to the left of the par-4 11th, replaced by bunkers, and even more trees chopped down on a hill left of the par-4 18th to make room for money-making hospitality boxes. There’s no question that this latest remodeling, rushed though it was, improved the course. The course was also rerouted for the 2022 Presidents Cup.
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10. Kapalua: Plantation (The Sentry)

Kapalua: Plantation
Public
Kapalua: Plantation
Lahaina, HI

From Golf Digest Architecture Editor emeritus Ron Whitten: Most golf fans are familiar with Kapalua Golf Club’s Plantation Course, home of the PGA Tour's opening event each year. Located on the north shore of the Hawaiian island of Maui, the Plantation was built from open, windswept pineapple fields on the pronounced slope of a volcano and is irrigated by sprinklers pressured solely by gravity. As the first design collaboration by Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw, it unveiled their joint admiration for old-style courses. The blind drive on the fourth, the cut-the-corner drives on the fifth and sixth are all based on tee shots found at National Golf Links. So, too, are its punchbowl green and strings of diagonal bunkers. It's also a massive course, built on a huge scale, Coore says, to accommodate the wind and the slope and the fact that it gets mostly resort play.

 

Read our architecture editor's complete review here

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11. East Lake Golf Club (Tour Championship)

East Lake Golf Club
Private
East Lake Golf Club
Atlanta, GA, United States
Tom Bendelow actually laid out the original course at East Lake, back when it was known as Atlanta Athletic Club, and that was the layout upon which Stewart Maiden taught the game to the now-legendary Bobby Jones. Donald Ross basically built a new course on the same spot in 1915, which remained untouched until changes were made before the 1963 Ryder Cup. When Atlanta Athletic moved to the suburbs in the late 1960s, the intown East Lake location fell on hard financial times until being rescued in the 1990s by businessman Tom Cousins, who made it a sterling fusion of corporate and inner-city involvement. Rees Jones redesigned most holes beginning in the mid-90s, making the course more reflective of his views of championship golf. After the PGA Tour reversed the nines for the 2016 Tour Championship (flipping the unpopular par-3 finish into the ninth hole), the club made the new routing permanent for regular play. East Lake will undergo another major renovation following the 2023 Tour Championship, this time by Andrew Green, who will highlight the Donald Ross heritage.
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12. Harbour Town Golf Links (RBC Heritage)

Harbour Town Golf Links
Public
Harbour Town Golf Links
Hilton Head Island, SC, United States
In the late 1960s, Jack Nicklaus landed the design contract for Harbour Town, then turned it over to his new partner, Pete Dye, who was determined to distinguish his work from that of rival Robert Trent Jones. Soon after Harbour Town opened in late November 1969 (with a victory by Arnold Palmer in the Heritage Classic), the course debuted on America’s 100 Greatest as one of the Top 10. It was a total departure for golf at the time. No mounds, no elevated tees, no elevated greens—just low-profile and abrupt change. Tiny greens hung atop railroad ties directly over water hazards. Trees blocked direct shots. Harbour Town gave Pete Dye national attention and put Jack Nicklaus, who made more than 100 inspection trips in collaborating with Dye, in the design business. Pete’s wife, Alice, also contributed, instructing workers on the size and shape of the unique 13th green, a sinister one edged by cypress planks.
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13. Colonial Country Club (Charles Schwab Challenge)

Colonial Country Club
Private
Colonial Country Club
Fort Worth, TX, United States
We give credit to Texas golf historian Frances G. Trimble for establishing the fact that Perry Maxwell, not John Bredemus, originally designed Colonial Country Club for Fort Worth businessman Marvin Leonard. Both architects submitted routings. Maxwell’s was used, while Bredemus supervised construction. Colonial sported the first bent-grass greens in Texas when it opened in 1936. In 1939, the USGA awarded Colonial its 1941 U.S. Open, the first ever in Texas, so Leonard brought Maxwell back to toughen the course. He added 56 bunkers and created the present par-3 fourth and par-4 fifth (two of the famed Horrible Horseshoe trio of holes) and a par-3 13th (since replaced following a 1968 rechanneling of the Trinity River). Keith Foster’s 2008 restoration wasn’t to everyone’s satisfaction. In 2023, Gil Hanse and his team will perform a complete restoration of the Maxwell design, giving it a similar treatment to the one they gave Maxwell's Southern Hills in 2018.
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14. Torrey Pines Golf Course: South (Farmers Insurance Open)

Torrey Pines Golf Course: South
Public
Torrey Pines Golf Course: South
La Jolla, CA, United States
Torrey Pines sits on one of the prettiest golf course sites in America, atop coastal bluffs north of San Diego with eye-dazzling views of the Pacific. Rees Jones’ remodeling of the South Course in the early 2000s not only made the course competitive for the 2008 U.S. Open (won by Tiger Woods in a playoff over Rocco Mediate), it also brought several coastal canyons into play for everyday play, especially on the par-3 third and par-4 14th. An annual PGA Tour stop, Torrey Pines received another boost by Jones prior to hosting its second U.S. Open in 2021, this one won by Jon Rahm.
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15. PGA West: Stadium (The American Express)

PGA West: Stadium Course
Public
PGA West: Stadium Course
La Quinta, CA, United States
Originally private, the Stadium Course (the original 18 at PGA West) was among the rota of courses for the old Bob Hope Desert Classic until some pros, objecting to its difficulty, petitioned to remove it. (It’s now back.) It's Pete Dye at his rambunctious best, with a finish mimicking his later design at TPC Sawgrass: a gambling par-5 16th (called San Andreas Fault), a short par-3 17th to an island green and an intimidating par-4 18th with water all the way to the green. Though hideous in its difficulty and aesthetics by 1980s standards (it was can't miss television when it hosted the 1987 Skins Game), it's matured into a noble piece of architecture that represents the tail end of Dye's extreme middle phase.
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16. The Dunes Golf & Beach Club (Myrtle Beach Classic)

The Dunes Golf & Beach Club
Private
The Dunes Golf & Beach Club
Myrtle Beach, SC, United States
Its ocean-side dunes are mostly covered with turfgrass and mature trees now, but when Robert Trent Jones built The Dunes back in the late 1940s, the property was primarily windswept sand dotted with lagoons. Those lakes come in prominently on many holes, particularly on the 11th through 13th, dubbed Alligator Alley. (The boomerang-shaped par-5 13th is called Waterloo.) The home hole, with a pond in front of the green, started as a gambling par 5 but today is a daunting par 4. The course has hosted three USGA championships, including the 1962 U.S. Women's Open and most recently, the 2017 U.S. Women's Amateur Four-Ball.
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17. TPC Southwind (FedEx St. Jude Championship)

TPC Southwind
Private
TPC Southwind
Memphis, TN, United States
3.8
55 Panelists
The Ron Prichard design (with consultation from Hubert Green and Fuzzy Zoeller) has hosted an event on the PGA Tour since 1989, and starting in 2022, it hosts one of the premier events on the PGA Tour schedule, the first leg of the FedEx Cup playoffs. Located about a half hour from downtown Memphis on an old dairy farm, TPC Southwind holds its own against the best players in the game with water coming into play on 11 holes. The par-3 11th hole is perhaps the course's signature hole, featuring a peninsula green that requires a short iron, similar to the 17th at TPC Sawgrass' Stadium course. The hole will be memorable for anyone who watched the 2022 FedEx St. Jude Championship, when Will Zalatoris' tee shot ended up staying dry and wedging itself between the grass, in his playoff victory over Sepp Straka.
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18. Waialae Country Club (Sony Open in Hawaii)

Waialae Country Club
Private
Waialae Country Club
Honolulu, HI
4.3
27 Panelists
Now with The Greenbrier’s Old White course out of the rotation, Waialae Country Club is the only Seth Raynor design on the PGA Tour schedule. In the 1960s, much of the front nine had to be rerouted due the construction of a nearby hotel, but many Raynor elements can still be found, particularly after Tom Doak and his Renaissance Design team’s work over the past decade-plus. Though the now iconic ‘W’s in the trees on the 16th hole (the club’s seventh) are the most recognizable feature of the course, true architectural buffs will appreciate the par-3 17th hole and its Redan green, plus the Biarritz on the fourth.
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19. TPC San Antonio: Oaks (Valero Texas Open)

TPC San Antonio Oaks Course
Private
TPC San Antonio Oaks Course
San Antonio, TX
3
55 Panelists
TPC San Antonio’s Oaks course has hosted the Valero Texas Open since 2010. Playing through the dry outlands north of the city, the Greg Norman design is one of the most strategically compelling courses on tour with aggressive bunkering, some wonderful short par 4s and several uniquely demanding par 5s, including the 18th, one of the most underrated and frustrating closing holes the professionals play. --Derek Duncan, architecture editor
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20. Sedgefield Country Club (Wyndham Championship)

Sedgefield Country Club
Private
Sedgefield Country Club
Greensboro, NC, United States
4.3
55 Panelists
Opened in 1926, Sedgefield Country Club is a Donald Ross design that has been the longtime host of the PGA Tour’s Wyndham Championship. The course co-hosted the inaugural Greater Greensboro Open (today’s Wyndham) in 1938, won by Sam Snead. The tournament has been played at several courses over the years, and Sedgefield has hosted since 2008. In 2007, the course underwent a $3 million restoration project aimed at transforming the layout back to Ross’ original intent. In typical Ross style, the greens are quite busy, with prominent slopes demanding the player stay below the hole.
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21. Arnold Palmer's Bay Hill Club & Lodge (Arnold Palmer Invitational)

Arnold Palmer's Bay Hill Club & Lodge: Challenger/Champion
4
105 Panelists

From Golf Digest Architecture Editor emeritus Ron Whitten: I've always been fascinated by the design of Bay Hill, Arnold Palmer's home course for over 45 years (although Tiger Woods owns it, competitively-speaking, as he's won there eight times.) For one thing, it's rather hilly, a rarity in Florida (although not in the Orlando market) and dotted with sinkhole ponds incorporated in the design in dramatic ways.

 

I always thought the wrap-around-a-lake par-5 sixth was Dick Wilson's version of Robert Trent Jones's decade-older 13th at The Dunes Club at Myrtle Beach. Each of the two rivals had claimed the other was always stealing his ideas. But the hole I like best at Bay Hill is the par-4 eighth, a lovely dogleg-right with a diagonal green perched above a small circular pond. OK, I admit that it reminds me of the sixth at Hazeltine National, another Trent Jones product, but I don't think Wilson picked Trent's pocket on this one, as both courses were built about the same time, in the early 1960s.

 

Check out our architecture editor's complete review, here.

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22. Innisbrook Resort: Copperhead (Valspar Championship)

Innisbrook Resort: Copperhead
Private
Innisbrook Resort: Copperhead
Palm Harbor, FL
4.2
108 Panelists
The Copperhead course is most famous for hosting the PGA Tour's Valspar Championship every April, but Innisbrook is home to three more championship courses—Island, North and South—with views more like the sand hills of the Carolinas than you might expect in Florida. The Copperhead course is a tough ball-striking challenge with tight, tree-lined fairways and a demanding three-hole finish—known as the Snake Pit—that often makes for dramatic finishes to the annual PGA Tour stop.
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23. PGA National Resort & Spa: Champion (Cognizant Classic in The Palm Beaches)

PGA National Resort: Champion
Private
PGA National Resort: Champion
Palm Beach Gardens, FL, United States
4.1
298 Panelists

One of five courses at PGA National, the Champion Course has hosted the Honda Classic since 2007. (The event dates back to 1972, though with Honda pulling out as a tournament sponsor, the event is in question going forward.) Originally designed by Tom and George Fazio for tournament play, Jack Nicklaus redesigned the course in 2014, creating the infamous three-hole stretch aptly named "The Bear Trap." Routinely one of the toughest courses on tour, The Champion is a true ball-striking test that plays a lot differently than most courses, where winning scores push over 20 under par.

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24. TPC Deere Run (John Deere Classic)

TPC Deere Run
Public
TPC Deere Run
Silvis, IL
4.1
44 Panelists
The John Deere Classic began in 1971 as the Quad Cities Open (named for the four cities—Davenport, Bettendorf, Rock Island and Moline—that border the Iowa and Illinois sides of the Mississippi River, respectively). It moved to its current home, TPC Deere Run, in 2000, a layout designed at that time by former PGA Tour player D.A. Weibring and design partner Steve Wolfard. The architecture is befitting of a course that came off the desk of a tour pro and was calibrated to host a professional event: Though the strength of the field is typically diluted given the tournament’s traditional place on the schedule the week before the Open Championship, it’s a venue the players who participate in the John Deere Classic love.The routing constantly switches directions as it winds through a wooded property near Rock River, and most holes have some degree of left-to-right or right-to-left movement caused by doglegs and bunkers. At just over 7,200 yards and yielding winning scores around 20-under, it’s an attractive test for shorter players who like to work the ball as well as for those in dire need of seeing plenty of birdies on their card. --Derek Duncan
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25. Tahoe Mountain Club: Old Greenwood (Barracuda Championship)

Tahoe Mountain Club: Old Greenwood
4
54 Panelists
Old Greenwood is one of two 18-hole courses at Tahoe Mountain Club, and since 2020 the Jack Nicklaus signature design has hosted the PGA Tour’s modified stableford event, the Barracuda Championship. Winding through pine forests, meadows, and hilly terrain, Old Greenwood is both a challenging and aesthetically pleasing course.
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26. TPC River Highlands (Travelers Championship)

TPC River Highlands
Private
TPC River Highlands
Cromwell, CT
4.3
34 Panelists
TPC River Highlands has a long history hosting the annual Travelers Championship on the PGA Tour, dating back to 1984, when Pete Dye redesigned nine of the existing holes (formerly Edgewood Country Club). Then one of Dye's former associates, Bobby Weed, returned in 1989 to not only renovate the existing course but add holes as part of a newly built home-development project, one of the first of its kind. Weed has continued to return to renovate the course over the years, including most recently a substantial bunker project in 2016.
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27. TPC Scottsdale: Stadium (WM Phoenix Open)

TPC Scottsdale: Stadium
Public
TPC Scottsdale: Stadium
Scottsdale, AZ, United States
3.9
232 Panelists
The famed home of the WM Phoenix Open boasts probably the most well-known stadium hole in golf: the par-3 16th. Tiger Woods' hole-in-one in 1997 put it on the map for casual fans, who now flock to Scottsdale during Super Bowl week. The layout has architectural merit, too, with its risk-and-reward-filled back nine. Tom Weiskopf, who designed the course with Jay Morrish, has overseen renovations of the course—making tweaks to please the tour player and resort guest alike.
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28. TPC Craig Ranch (The CJ Cup Byron Nelson)

TPC Craig Ranch
Private
TPC Craig Ranch
McKinney, TX
3.3
31 Panelists
TPC Craig Ranch, located in the Dallas suburb of McKinney, is a Tom Weiskopf design that plays among gently rolling hills and on the limestone banks of Rowlett Creek, which crosses the course 14 times. In 2020, the course signed a five-year agreement to host the PGA Tour’s AT&T Byron Nelson. South Korean K.H. Lee captured the first two titles at TPC Craig Ranch, which surrendered low scoring in each of the three years it's held the event, 2021, 2022 and 2023.
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29. Memorial Park Golf Course (Texas Children's Houston Open)

Memorial Park Golf Course
Public
Memorial Park Golf Course
Houston, TX
3.8
34 Panelists
A significant renovation was completed by Tom Doak (in collaboration with Brooks Koepka) to transform the old municipal course at Memorial Park—which hosted the first Houston Open in 1947 and then again from 1951 through 1965—into a layout worthy of being a PGA Tour venue. Originally built in 1912 at a hospital near Camp Logan for recovering soldiers to use, architect John Bredemus redesigned the course in 1935 and added a second nine. Now with signature Doak green complexes and tour-level conditioning, Memorial Park is once again a must-play in the state and averages 60,000 rounds a year.
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30. TPC Louisiana (Zurich Classic of New Orleans)

TPC Louisiana
Public
TPC Louisiana
Avondale, LA
3.7
59 Panelists
Home of the Zurich Classic of New Orleans since 2007, this Pete Dye design exudes a flair of TPC Sawgrass with some more low-profile design features like hidden bunkers and green complexes that offer options on approach. Dye had help from fellow tour pros Steve Elkington and New Orleans native Kelly Gibson on this 7,400 yard par-72 layout. Consistently ranked in the top 10 of Golf Digest’s Best in State, TPC Lousiana offers a nice mix of challenging short and long holes.
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31. Detroit Golf Club: North (Rocket Mortgage Classic)

Detroit Golf Club: North
Private
Detroit Golf Club: North
Detroit, MI, United States
4.2
34 Panelists
Donald Ross designed two 18-hole courses at Detroit Golf Club on a tight plot of land in the middle of the city. An extensive renovation project was completed by Bruce Hepner in 2015 to restore the greens and bunkers. Most holes are framed by trees and are mostly up and back on flat land, though subtle rumbles in the land provide enough movement to offer strategic value and demanding shotmaking into these Ross greens, which average 5,150 square feet.
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32. TPC Twin Cities (3M Open)

TPC Twin Cities
Private
TPC Twin Cities
Blaine, MN
4
19 Panelists
As if destined to be a golf course, TPC Twin Cities was built on the site of a former sod farm. The Arnold Palmer design 15 miles north of Minneapolis/St. Paul has hosted the PGA Tour’s 3M Open since 2019. A past member of our Best in Minnesota list, TPC Twin Cities plays among native prairie grasses and includes 27 bodies of water, notably at the par-5 18th, where a large lake guards the right side of the fairway and the front of the green.
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