U.S. Open

Pinehurst Resort & Country Club (Course No. 2)



Best in State

The best golf courses in Oregon

One of American golf’s greatest grillroom debates, for those lucky enough to have played on the southern Oregon coast, is which course at Bandon Dunes Resort is the best. For our 1,900 course-ranking panelists, the consensus is the Tom Doak-designed Pacific Dunes, as seen here in our latest ranking of the Best Golf Courses in Oregon. The truth is, each of the courses at Bandon Dunes has a unique appeal, making the debate live on. Golf in Oregon isn’t only about Bandon, however, and this latest Best in State list reflects the depth of great golf in The Beaver State.

Below you'll find our 2023-'24 ranking of the Best Golf Courses in Oregon.

We urge you to click through to each individual course page for bonus photography, drone footage and reviews from our course panelists. Plus, you can now leave your own ratings on the courses you’ve played … to make your case why your favorite should be ranked higher. 

1. (1) Pacific Dunes
Stephen Szurlej
Public
1. (1) Pacific Dunes
Bandon, OR, United States
This was the second course constructed at Bandon Dunes Resort and the highest ranked among the resort’s five 18s. To best utilize ocean frontage, Tom Doak came up an unorthodox routing that includes four par 3s on the back nine. Holes seem to emerge from the landscape rather than being superimposed onto it with rolling greens and rumpled fairways framed by rugged sand dunes and marvelously grotesque bunkers. The secret is Doak moved a lot of earth in some places to make it look like he moved very little, but the result is a course with sensual movements, like a tango that steps toward the coast and back again, dipping in and out of different playing arenas from the secluded sand blowouts to the exposed bluffs and all variations in between.
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2. (2) Bandon Dunes
Stephen Szurlej
Public
2. (2) Bandon Dunes
Bandon, OR, United States
Chicago recycled-products mogul Mike Keiser took a gamble when he chose then-tenderfoot architect David McLay Kidd to design a destination daily fee on the remote southwestern coastline of Oregon. But the design Kidd produced, faithful to the links-golf tenets of his native Scotland, proved so popular that today Keiser has a multiple-course resort at Bandon Dunes that rivals Pinehurst and the Monterey Peninsula—or perhaps exceeds them given that all fve Bandon courses are ranked on our 200 Greatest, four in the top 100. None of that would have happened if McLay Kidd hadn’t produced a great first design that drew golfers into its orbit.
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3. (3) Old Macdonald
Stephen Szurlej
Public
3. (3) Old Macdonald
Bandon, OR, United States
Old Mike Keiser had a course. Name of Bandon Dunes. Hugged the cliffs of Oregon gorse. It made golfers swoon. So he added one more, then a third next door. Here a lodge, there a hut, even built a pitch & putt. Now it's America's top resort. Name of Bandon Dunes. But Old Mike Keiser wanted more. Down at Bandon Dunes. An ode to an architect he adored. Cut from heather and broom. So Old Macdonald came to be. In spite of a bad economy. Here it's big, there it's bold. Everywhere it looks real old. A Road Hole here, a Cape Hole there. Bottle Hole, Biarritz, ocean winds that'll give you fits. Short and Eden fit the scenes. Especially with enormous greens. Old Macdonald is part of the lore. Now at Bandon Dunes.
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4. (4) Bandon Trails
Stephen Szurlej
Public
4. (4) Bandon Trails
Bandon, OR, United States
The only one of Bandon Dunes' five 18-hole courses that isn't immediately adjacent to the Pacific coastline, Trails scores points other ways, taking players on a fantastic journey through three distinct ecosytems. The course starts in serious sand dunes then turns inward toward meadows and dense Oregon rainforest, climbing toward an upper section at holes nine through 13. Fourteen is a love-it or-hate-it par 4 to a thumb of a green personally fashioned by Crenshaw that can be driven with an unerring drive off a high bluff, dropping the holes back to the meadows and ultimately to the dunes at 17 and 18. Bump-and-run is the name of the game but the structure of each hole requires thoughtful bumps and targeted runs.
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5. (5) Sheep Ranch
Dom Furore
Public
5. (5) Sheep Ranch
Bandon, OR, United States
Sheep Ranch began life as a different Sheep Ranch in the early 2000s, a rag-tag, cross-country, 13-hole course with no irrigation built by Tom Doak on a bluff just north of what would later become Old Macdonald. It was a little-used recreation that only insiders knew about. Mike Keiser tapped Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw to convert it into Bandon Dunes’ fifth regulation 18-hole course and Coore and Crenshaw’s second. Spread across an open, windswept plateau, using many of the same greensites, Coore managed to triangulate the holes in such a way that nine now touch the cliff edge along the Pacific Ocean. Extremely wide fairways and large putting surfaces allow the exposed course to be playable in extreme winds, and with its fast arrival to the top 15 public courses alongside Bandon’s other courses, Sheep Ranch has accomplished the most difficult of feats for resort courses—distinction among equals.
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6. (6) Pronghorn Resort: Fazio Course
Pronghorn Club at Juniper Preserve
4.3
32 Panelists
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7. (7) Eugene Country Club
John Giustina
Private
7. (7) Eugene Country Club
Eugene, OR, United States
4.1
117 Panelists
Eugene was the site of one of golf most profound renovations in 1965 when Robert Trent Jones reversed the direction of each hole on the H.C. Egan design, building long tee boxes, all new greens and stylized bunkers that pinch targets and turn doglegs—turning Eugene Country Club into one of the most challenging in the Pacific Northwest. The 2021 renovation wasn’t so radical, but the changes initiated by Tim Jackson and David Kahn have made the course more thought-provoking through the shifting of tees, remodeling of bunkers, the expansion of greens that bring more hole locations into play and a renewed emphasis on using the unique ground contours and swales as more strategically influential factors. The towering Douglas fir trees still frame each hole and influence much of a golfer's strategy from tee to green.
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8. (8) Pronghorn Resort: Nicklaus Course
Courtesy of Evan Schiller
Public
8. (8) Pronghorn Resort: Nicklaus Course
Bend, OR, United States
When it first opened, Pronghorn was strictly private and its Nicklaus Course was ranked by Golf Digest as No. 2 among America’s Best New Private Courses of 2004. A few years back, the club (which also has a Fazio-designed 18), began allowing public play on its Nicklaus track. The Nicklaus back nine, carved from a flow of volcanic rock, may be the most delightful Jack has ever designed, with gambling holes and gorgeous scenery at every turn.
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9. (12) Crosswater Golf Course
Evan Schiller/evanschillerphotography.com
Private
9. (12) Crosswater Golf Course
Sunriver, OR, United States
Part of Crosswater was reportedly built in the meadow where John Wayne, as Rooster Cogburn, filmed his climactic charge with guns blazing in the 1969 film, True Grit. The Bob Cupp design is far more subtle than a Wayne western, with low-profile greens edged by graceful chipping areas and fairways intersected repeatedly by the Big and Little Dechutes rivers. Crosswater was Golf Digest's Best New Resort Course of 1995.
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10. (14) Tetherow Golf Club
Public
10. (14) Tetherow Golf Club
Bend, OR
A decade after David McLay Kidd established his architectural reputation with the original Bandon Dunes course, he returned to Oregon, settled in Bend and built another dazzling course, Tetherow. Far different than Bandon, with a manufactured landscape of lumps and bumps, far more bunkers, plus a couple of lakes, it nonetheless has the same fescue as at Bandon, so tee shots get plenty of roll and some approach shots can be bounced into flagsticks. The big difference is that Tetherow is a bear to play and demands a high degree of strength and skill to put up a good score, whereas Bandon Dunes creates opportunity when the wind isn't whipping. This design marked the beginning of Kidd's wandering phase where he lost sight of the reason most golfers enjoy the game and built a series of impressive and attractive but inforgiving courses. Even he admits Tetherow can be too penalizing. His response was Gamble Sands and Mammoth Dunes where tactics and recoverability take precedence over strict shot-making.
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11. (13) Waverley Country Club
USGA/Kirk H. Owens
Private
11. (13) Waverley Country Club
Portland, OR
4.1
48 Panelists
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12. (11) Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club: Witch Hollow
Public
12. (11) Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club: Witch Hollow
North Plains, OR, United States
4.4
67 Panelists
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13. (9) Silvies Valley Ranch: Craddock
Torin Foster
4.1
27 Panelists
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14. (NR) Columbia Edgewater Country Club
Courtesy of the club
3.6
41 Panelists
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15. (10) Silvies Valley Ranch: Hankins
Torin Foster
4.1
27 Panelists
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