11 golfers who served in the military

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11 golfers who served in the military

June 27, 2016

Photo By: Getty Images

Photo By: Getty Images

Photo By: Augusta National/Getty Images

Photo By: Getty Images

Photo By: Augusta National/Getty Images

Photo By: Getty Images

Photo By: Augusta National/Getty Images

Photo By: Getty Images

Photo By: US PGA TOUR

Photo By: Getty Images

Billy Hurley III

A 2004 Navy graduate, Hurley was one of the top amateurs in the country, competing for the winning American squad in the 2005 Walker Cup. Hurley served five years after graduation, including a tour of duty in the Persian Gulf. Prior to his win at Congressional, Hurley had seven career top 10s on the PGA Tour.

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Sang-Moon Bae

Sang-Moon Bae played admirably in last year's Presidents Cup in his home country of South Korea. The event marked Bae's last appearance before entering into a two-year stint with the South Korean military, as stipulated by the country of all men between the ages of 18-34.

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Lloyd Mangrum

Mangrum was a three-time winner on tour when he went into World War II service. He was offered a job as club professional at a military base but declined. He was awarded two Purple Hearts, and was wounded at the Battle of the Bulge. When he returned from duty, Mangrum won the 1946 U.S. Open, and would go on to capture the Vardon Trophy twice.

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Arnold Palmer

The golfer who directed Arnie's Army was actually a man of the sea. Following the death of his best friend at Wake Forest, Palmer was so overcome with emotion that he left college to enlist in the Coast Guard. Palmer served three years before returning to school. "I have to say that my three years in the Coast Guard was three years that I value very highly," Palmer said upon receiving a military honor in 2008.

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Bobby Jones

Though he was in his 40s at the time of conflict, Jones enlisted in World War II. Initially working in aerial map analysis, Jones insisted on a more action-based engagement, and specialized in prisoner interrogation. Jones was on the front lines at Normandy, with his unit receiving heavy fire.

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Lee Trevino

Trevino was a gunner for four years in the Marines. "The Marine Corps was the greatest thing that ever happened to me," Trevino told Jamie Diaz in 2009. "If they told me I had to go back in the Marines now, hell, I'd love it."

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Herman Keiser

The Missouri Mortician, who pulled off one of the biggest Masters upsets by defeating Ben Hogan in 1946, served aboard the USS Cincinnati in World War II.

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Larry Nelson

It was through the Army that Nelson was introduced to golf. While in the infantry in Vietnam, a fellow soldier piqued Nelson's curiosity in the game. When he returned to America, Nelson learned the sport through Ben Hogan's "Five Lessons" book. Despite picking up the game at age 22, Nelson would go on to win three majors.

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Orville Moody

Moody served in the U.S. Army for 14 years, overseeing the development and maintenance of military golf courses around the world, while also teaching fellow servicemen. Nicknamed "Sarge," Moody won the 1969 U.S. Open.

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Ben Hogan

The leading money winner from 1940 to 1942, Hogan was drafted in 1943, initially starting as a physical trainer before becoming a flight instructor. In his first year back, Hogan again topped the tour's money order.

K.J. Choi

If Bae needs a role model, Choi would be the worthy target. Serving as a rifleman in the South Korean military, Choi would practice his golf on days off.

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