Arnold Palmer's US Opens

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Arnold Palmer's US Opens

June 25, 2007

Arnold Palmer rips off his sunshade as he drops the final putt that gave him the National Open championship at Cherry Hills CC near Denver in 1960. "I was seven strokes back and really pumped up, ready to go," Palmer recalled.Arnold Palmer rips off his sunshade as he drops the final putt that gave him the National Open championship at Cherry Hills CC near Denver in 1960. "I was seven strokes back and really pumped up, ready to go," Palmer recalled.

Arnold Palmer congratulates Jack Nicklaus who placed second in the 1960 U.S Open. The reining U.S. amateur champ, Nicklaus beat every other pro except Palmer, who won by two strokes to claim his only Open title.Arnold Palmer congratulates Jack Nicklaus who placed second in the 1960 U.S Open. The reining U.S. amateur champ, Nicklaus beat every other pro except Palmer, who won by two strokes to claim his only Open title.

Arnold Palmer points to his name on the press tent scoreboard showing his four-under par total. His seven-stroke comeback on the final day remains a U.S. Open record.Arnold Palmer points to his name on the press tent scoreboard showing his four-under par total. His seven-stroke comeback on the final day remains a U.S. Open record.

Arnie and Jack await their opening tee shots at the start of the second round of the 1962 U.S. Open, held at Oakmont CC. Palmer and Nicklaus finished deadlocked at 283, with Nicklaus winning the 18-hole playoff on Monday. It was Jack's first victory as a professional and the first of four U.S. Open titles.Arnie and Jack await their opening tee shots at the start of the second round of the 1962 U.S. Open, held at Oakmont CC. Palmer and Nicklaus finished deadlocked at 283, with Nicklaus winning the 18-hole playoff on Monday. It was Jack's first victory as a professional and the first of four U.S. Open titles.

Arnie watches his ball roll past the cup on the 18th green during the final round of the 1962 Open at Oakmont. This miss forced him into a playoff with Nicklaus. Palmer's putter let him down throughout the championship: He had 11 three-putt greens over the 90 holes versus only one for Nicklaus.Arnie watches his ball roll past the cup on the 18th green during the final round of the 1962 Open at Oakmont. This miss forced him into a playoff with Nicklaus. Palmer's putter let him down throughout the championship: He had 11 three-putt greens over the 90 holes versus only one for Nicklaus.

Palmer eyes Nicklaus' short approach to the ninth green during their playoff for 1962 U.S. Open.Palmer eyes Nicklaus' short approach to the ninth green during their playoff for 1962 U.S. Open.

Another U.S. Open, another hard-to-fathom playoff loss. In 1963, Julius Boros defeated Arnold Palmer and Jacky Cupit in an 18-hole playoff at The Country Club in Brookline, Mass. Arnie's low point? Missing a two-footer on the 71st hole. Strong winds sent scores soaring through the week; the threesome's nine-over-par 72-hole scores were the highest since 1935, when Sam Parks won with 299 at Oakmont.Another U.S. Open, another hard-to-fathom playoff loss. In 1963, Julius Boros defeated Arnold Palmer and Jacky Cupit in an 18-hole playoff at The Country Club in Brookline, Mass. Arnie's low point? Missing a two-footer on the 71st hole. Strong winds sent scores soaring through the week; the threesome's nine-over-par 72-hole scores were the highest since 1935, when Sam Parks won with 299 at Oakmont.

At the 1964 U.S. Open, held at Congressional CC in Bethesda, Md., Palmer's 68 was the only sub-par round on the first day. He followed with a 69 to stay among the leaders, then slipped to a 75 on Saturday, six strokes back of Tommy Jacobs and four strokes behind eventual winner Ken Venturi.At the 1964 U.S. Open, held at Congressional CC in Bethesda, Md., Palmer's 68 was the only sub-par round on the first day. He followed with a 69 to stay among the leaders, then slipped to a 75 on Saturday, six strokes back of Tommy Jacobs and four strokes behind eventual winner Ken Venturi.

Palmer and his 15-year-old caddie, Jack Wallace, survey the drainage culvert where Palmer's ball came to rest during first-round play of the 1965 U.S. Open at Bellerive CC in St. Louis. (First in a sequence of four photos)Palmer and his 15-year-old caddie, Jack Wallace, survey the drainage culvert where Palmer's ball came to rest during first-round play of the 1965 U.S. Open at Bellerive CC in St. Louis. (First in a sequence of four photos)

Palmer takes his drop, using the over-the-shoulder method employed at the time...Palmer takes his drop, using the over-the-shoulder method employed at the time...

... Arnie looks over his lie...... Arnie looks over his lie...

... and lets it rip out of a snaggy, downhill lie. Arnie shot back-to-back 76s in the first U.S. Open played on four consecutive days to miss the cut. Gary Player finished with a two-over 282 to become the first foreign-born winner since Tommy Armour in 1927.... and lets it rip out of a snaggy, downhill lie. Arnie shot back-to-back 76s in the first U.S. Open played on four consecutive days to miss the cut. Gary Player finished with a two-over 282 to become the first foreign-born winner since Tommy Armour in 1927.

Arnold Palmer tries to coax a putt to drop at the 1966 U.S. Open held at Olympic CC, San Francisco.Arnold Palmer tries to coax a putt to drop at the 1966 U.S. Open held at Olympic CC, San Francisco.

Weakened by a back injury suffered earlier in the season, Arnold Palmer admitted that he tired late in each round of the 1966 Open.Weakened by a back injury suffered earlier in the season, Arnold Palmer admitted that he tired late in each round of the 1966 Open.

Having lost a seven-stroke lead in 8 holes, Palmer plays out of the rough to the 18th green during the final round. Both he and Casper two-putted for a tie. Arnie went 32-39 on the final day of regulation play; Casper came home in 36-32.Having lost a seven-stroke lead in 8 holes, Palmer plays out of the rough to the 18th green during the final round. Both he and Casper two-putted for a tie. Arnie went 32-39 on the final day of regulation play; Casper came home in 36-32.

Palmer blasts out of a greenside bunker at the 16th hole during his playoff with Casper. From a partially buried lie, he got the ball out but two-putted for a double bogey 7 and went on to lose the playoff by four strokes.Palmer blasts out of a greenside bunker at the 16th hole during his playoff with Casper. From a partially buried lie, he got the ball out but two-putted for a double bogey 7 and went on to lose the playoff by four strokes.

In the 1967 U.S. Open, Palmer had the support of his army, but not his putter, which he blamed as the prime factor in finishing second by four strokes to Jack Nicklaus. Despite the loss, Palmer remained the tour's leading money winner, having cracking the $100,000 barrier with his $15,000 runner-up check and with 10 in-the-money finishes in 11 starts.In the 1967 U.S. Open, Palmer had the support of his army, but not his putter, which he blamed as the prime factor in finishing second by four strokes to Jack Nicklaus. Despite the loss, Palmer remained the tour's leading money winner, having cracking the $100,000 barrier with his $15,000 runner-up check and with 10 in-the-money finishes in 11 starts.

As Palmer looks on, Jack Nicklaus kicks his leg after sinking a birdie putt on the 18th hole to capture his second U.S. Open title. Nicklaus and Palmer were paired together the final two rounds, and Jack admitted that Arnie was a target on Sunday. "I felt if I could beat Arnie, I would win the tournament because I knew he would play well," said Jack, who closed with a 65 to Arnie's 69.As Palmer looks on, Jack Nicklaus kicks his leg after sinking a birdie putt on the 18th hole to capture his second U.S. Open title. Nicklaus and Palmer were paired together the final two rounds, and Jack admitted that Arnie was a target on Sunday. "I felt if I could beat Arnie, I would win the tournament because I knew he would play well," said Jack, who closed with a 65 to Arnie's 69.

Arnold Palmer reacts to missing a birdie putt on the fifth green during the second round of the 1972 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach, Calif.Arnold Palmer reacts to missing a birdie putt on the fifth green during the second round of the 1972 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach, Calif.

Arnold Palmer grimaces in reaction to a missed putt for par on the eighth green during the third round of the '72 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach. "It got to be ridiculous," he confessed of his putting. Wrote Golf World's Dick Taylor: "...his was a round of so many missed putts, as has been his year, that suddenly one felt sad perhaps for the first time ever, for this great champion. Palmer finished in third place, four strokes back of Nicklaus.Arnold Palmer grimaces in reaction to a missed putt for par on the eighth green during the third round of the '72 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach. "It got to be ridiculous," he confessed of his putting. Wrote Golf World's Dick Taylor: "...his was a round of so many missed putts, as has been his year, that suddenly one felt sad perhaps for the first time ever, for this great champion. Palmer finished in third place, four strokes back of Nicklaus.

Here's one fine way to combat putting woes: Arnold Palmer smiles after holing his chip shot for a birdie on the third hole during a practice round at Pebble Beach Golf Links prior to the 1982 U.S. Open. The smiles soon faded, as Arnie shot 81-75 to miss the cut -- and Tom Watson's dramatic two-stroke victory over Jack Nicklaus.Here's one fine way to combat putting woes: Arnold Palmer smiles after holing his chip shot for a birdie on the third hole during a practice round at Pebble Beach Golf Links prior to the 1982 U.S. Open. The smiles soon faded, as Arnie shot 81-75 to miss the cut -- and Tom Watson's dramatic two-stroke victory over Jack Nicklaus.

After sinking his final putt in his final U.S. Open, Arnold Palmer waves to the gallery on the 18th green during the second round of the 1994 U.S. Open at Oakmont CC near Pittsburgh. Arnie finished with an 81 and at 16 over par, to miss the cut but not the adulation of his home-state fans and golfers worldwide. The King played in 32 U.S. Opens, made the cut in 24, with 18 top-25 finishes and six top 3s, including his 1960 U.S. Open Championship victory.After sinking his final putt in his final U.S. Open, Arnold Palmer waves to the gallery on the 18th green during the second round of the 1994 U.S. Open at Oakmont CC near Pittsburgh. Arnie finished with an 81 and at 16 over par, to miss the cut but not the adulation of his home-state fans and golfers worldwide. The King played in 32 U.S. Opens, made the cut in 24, with 18 top-25 finishes and six top 3s, including his 1960 U.S. Open Championship victory.

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