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Best golf courses near West Palm Beach, FL

Below, you’ll find a list of courses near West Palm Beach, FL. There are 87 courses within a 15-mile radius of West Palm Beach, 23 of which are public courses and 63 are private courses. There are 77 18-hole courses and 8 nine-hole layouts.

The above has been curated through Golf Digest’s Places to Play course database, where we have collected star ratings and reviews from our 1,900 course-ranking panelists. Join our community by signing up for Golf Digest+ and rate the courses you’ve visited recently.

Trump International Golf Club West Palm Beach: Championship
4.3
114 Panelists
Long before he was President of the United States, or even a TV reality show host, Donald Trump built a golf course, on prime real estate in West Palm Beach, which he got from Palm Beach County. In exchange for a 100-year lease, Trump agreed not to sue the county for noise disturbance to Mar-A-Lago resort. He hired Tom Fazio’s older, less-celebrated brother Jim Fazio to design a course that would rival Trump’s casino rival Steve Wynn’s baby, No. 27 Shadow Creek in Vegas. Jim moved 2 million cubic yards of dirt to create 58 feet of elevation change and planted 5,000 mature trees. Lakes linked by recirculating streams were built, as was a monolithic waterfall on the 17th. The result is Shadow Creek Southeast. “Steve Wynn is a friend of mine,” Trump said in a 1999 interview. “I did get certain ideas from Shadow Creek because I think he did a very good job. I made them bigger and better.”
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Bear Lakes Country Club: Links
Private
Bear Lakes Country Club: Links
West Palm Beach, FL
3.9
11 Panelists
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The Breakers Rees Jones Course: Breakers Rees Jones
3.8
5 Panelists
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The Club At Ibis: Legend Course
Private
The Club At Ibis: Legend Course
West Palm Beach, FL
3.8
49 Panelists
The Club At Ibis Legend Course in West Palm Beach is one of the best golf courses in Florida. Discover our experts reviews and tee time information.
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Emerald Dunes Club
Private
Emerald Dunes Club
West Palm Beach, FL
3.2
86 Panelists
Emerald Dunes was developed as a high-end public course. Now it's one of the most sought-after private courses in the Palm Beach market with initiation fees to match. The design weaves around a series lakes, and water or marshes come into play on nearly every hole. Knowing that the lakes would be so prevalent, team Fazio played up the "aquatic theme" as he calls it carving scalloped edge banks and nurturing native plants along the shorelines.
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Banyan Cay Resort & Golf
Private
Banyan Cay Resort & Golf
West Palm Beach, FL
2.5
35 Panelists
Designed by Jack Nicklaus and John Sanford, the team responsible for Trump Golf Links at Ferry Point in NYC and Naples Beach Hotel G.C., the new course at Banyan Cay replaces the old Presidents Country Club. The greens are undulating and often very quick. Surrounding the greens are large run-off areas to allow for either chipping or putting and large bunker complexes and greenside bunkers, including several U.K.-style pot bunkers with sod walls.
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Seminole Golf Club
Private
Seminole Golf Club
Juno Beach, FL
4.8
211 Panelists
A majestic Donald Ross design with a clever routing on a rectangular site, each hole at Seminole encounters a new wind direction. The greens are no longer Ross, replaced 50 years ago in a regrassing effort that showed little appreciation for the original rolling contours. The bunkers aren’t Ross either. Dick Wilson replaced them in 1947, his own version meant to the imitate crests of waves on the adjacent Atlantic. A few years back, Bill Coore & Ben Crenshaw redesigned the bunkers again, along with exposing some sandy expanses in the rough. Seminole has long been one of America’s most exclusive clubs, which is why it was thrilling to see it on TV for a first time during the TaylorMade Driving Relief match, and then again for the 2021 Walker Cup.
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High Ridge Country Club
Private
High Ridge Country Club
Lantana, FL
4.5
33 Panelists
High Ridge Country Club in Lantana is one of the best golf courses in Florida. Discover our experts reviews and tee time information.
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Trump National Golf Club Jupiter
Private
Trump National Golf Club Jupiter
Jupiter, FL
4.5
90 Panelists
Trump bought the Ritz-Carlton resort in 2012. Its Jack Nicklaus design is one of a number of quality courses in the area—including the Bear's Club down the road and the Floridian.
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Old Marsh Golf Club
Private
Old Marsh Golf Club
Palm Beach Gardens, FL
4.3
91 Panelists
Old Marsh Golf Club in Palm Beach Gardens is one of the best golf courses in Florida. Discover our experts reviews and tee time information.
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Okeeheelee Golf Course: Eagle
Public
Okeeheelee Golf Course: Eagle
West Palm Beach, FL
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Bear Lakes Country Club: Lakes
Private
Bear Lakes Country Club: Lakes
West Palm Beach, FL
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Banyan Golf Club
Private
Banyan Golf Club
West Palm Beach, FL
From Golf Digest Architecture Editor emeritus Ron Whitten: In 1972, architect Joe Lee was hired to create Banyan Golf Club, a private club on land in West Palm Beach that included 80 acres of abandoned shell-mine pits. Given the spoil mounds, the site offered elevations up to 36 feet (almost unheard of in south Florida) and several mining lakes, but it was almost barren of trees. Joe felt he needed a large number of trees to beautify the raw land, but the developer didn't have the budget for such an extravagance. Then Joe heard that Interstate 95 would soon be pushed northward from West Palm Beach to Orlando, through forests of pine, cypress and oak. He arranged to have thousands of trees removed from the paths of advancing bulldozers and trucked to the Banyan construction site, where he would plant them along various holes. Transplanting mature trees on a golf course is a common occurrence these days, although it is an expensive proposition. It was almost unheard of back in the early 1970s, as was the notion that one could get the trees for free. "We didn't have sophisticated tree-moving equipment they have nowadays," Joe recalled years later. "All we had was a flatbed truck and a crane. We didn't have time to prune and trim the branches back. We didn't have time to let them acclimate. We didn't even have a way to water them. He had to get in there, pull them out, haul them back, plant them and go back for more." A lot of those trees didn't make it, but a lot of them did. Banyan opened in 1973 and within a few years, Banyan was a veritable tropical rainforest, each hole a secluded entity onto itself, framed by hardwoods salvaged from the freeway project and by more exotic varieties obtained elsewhere, like Brazilian peppers, acacia and melaleuca. Ironically, there are only three Banyan trees on the whole property. The owner just liked the name. By the 1980s, the lush tropical canopies also began blocking much needed air and sunlight to tees and greens. Dan Jones, Banyan's superintendent at the time, instituted an aggressive program of tree-trimming and tree replacement. Out went the melaleucas and other exotics, in came fruit trees. Then came a tornado that wiped out 400 trees. That was followed by successive hurricanes, which knocked over hundreds more. But Banyan recovered and replanted again and again. Today, Banyan is still a heavily treed golf course but now has far more palms than hardwoods, and more varieties common to south Florida. In 2012, John Sanford rebuilt the bunkers with grass faces, which was not really the style of Joe Lee, so in 2017, the bunkers were renovated again, this time by Kipp Schulties. But while Kipp's bunkers are of the flashed sand-type that Joe favored, the bunker shapes are now far more simplistic ovals than anything Joe ever built. Plus there are now acres of exposed sand under trees and around some tees, some of the sand covered in pine straw, some of it not. I don't think it's what Joe wouldn't have advocated. Still, the basic routing has been preserved, which is good. Privately, Joe Lee had admitted to me that Banyan was his favorite design.
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Okeeheelee Golf Course: Heron
Public
Okeeheelee Golf Course: Heron
West Palm Beach, FL
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Cypress Lakes
Private
Cypress Lakes
West Palm Beach, FL
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The Park at West Palm Beach
Public
The Park at West Palm Beach
West Palm Beach, FL
In the current age of new elite private clubs and faraway destinatiion resorts, the opening of a public municipal-affiliated golf course in an urban area is major news—especially when Tiger Woods shows up for the grand opening, like he did in March 2023. The Park is the latest in a growing trend of public/private partnerships that have fueled the redevelopment of numerous municipal courses around the country. The new course is set on the site of the former Dick Wilson-designed West Palm Beach Golf Course, one of the first notable designs of the post-World War II years when it opened in 1947 and long considered among the top municipal courses in the country. That course closed in 2018 due to deteriorating playability and diminished interest and sat fallow for several years. Several plans for different uses of the land were proposed before a group of local citizens, led in part by Seth Waugh, CEO of the PGA of America, raised $56 million in individual donations to re-imagine the property as a community gathering space with amenities that include, in addition to golf, youth activities and educational programs, shopping and dining. Woods was one of the donors. (Note: the PGA of America is not connected to the project.) The fundraisers and City of West Palm Beach hired Hanse and Wagner to create a new 18-hole course on the property’s existing site, located just off I-95 less than two miles south of the Palm Beach International Airport. Also included in the redevelopment is a state-of-the-art practice facility, a lighted nine-hole short course and a two-acre children’s-only golf zone. Hanse and Wagner retained nothing of the Wilson course and originally envisioned using its deep, sandy terrain to craft holes that would look and play like the Sand Belt courses of Melbourne, Australia. In routing the course, however, they removed pockets of trees, palmetto and other vegetation—crucial ingredients of Sand Belt courses—that would have enhanced that effect. “There are certain parts of the golf course where you get that Sand Belt feel—I hear the comparison a lot on 11, the par 3, and No. 6, the short par 4—but as Jim and I started to go through it we discussed how we were going to differentiate this golf course from some of the other things we’d done,” Hanse says. “We started to move away from the Sand Belt look and go more toward exposed sand areas because of the scale and width that we had.” The width, exposure and sightlines that were created once the land was cleared came to define the design’s concept, specifically fairways of enormous breadth, greens that are shaped or oriented to receive shots from specific points in the fairways, and highly contoured putting surfaces. “One of the cool things Tiger said when he was here, and he’s been by a few times, was this is a ‘one-ball course’—you’re not going to lose a ball out here,” Hanse says. Read Derek Duncan's full piece here.
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