Swing Sequence: Retief Goosen

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Swing Sequence: Retief Goosen

October 20, 2010

GOOSE STEPS IT UP

I've been playing very consistent this year, which is quite nice, but I've just not been winning. I've had a lot of top 10s [eight in his first 14 PGA Tour events of 2010], but that doesn't mean anything to me. It's that No. 1 that counts. To win again, I'm working on staying on top of the ball. I broke my left arm skiing in 1999, and since then I've never been able to straighten it during the downswing. Because of the bend, I sometimes fall back and get the club under the ball and hit it poorly. So my goal is to get my weight over to my left side and stay on top of the ball. When I do that, I feel like I can really play my best golf.-- Retief Goosen
BIO: 41, 5-feet-11, 185 pounds | CURRENT DRIVER: TaylorMade Burner SuperFast TP 9.5 deg. | BALL: TaylorMade Penta TP | DRIVING DISTANCE (RANK): 290.7 yards (62nd) | SCORING AVERAGE (RANK): 69.86 (3rd)

STAYING ON TOP OF IT

Goosen has put more emphasis on the tee ballTwo-time U.S. Open Champion Retief Goosen "has at least another major or two in him," says his swing coach, Gregor Jamieson. Considering Goosen turned 41 in February and went five years on the PGA Tour from September 2005 to September 2010 with only one win ('09 Transitions Championship), Jamieson's statement might seem like hyperbole. But improvements to Goosen's driver swing have player and teacher confident that "Goose" is still an elite player."He's always been known as a great iron player, so we've worked hard on his driver swing," Jamieson says. "A lot of people don't know this, but when he first joined the European tour, his swing was almost as long as John Daly's. He was incredibly strong and flexible and could really hit it a long way -- still can. But he needed more control, so he's worked on firming it up. His swing is intentionally shorter now and a lot easier to control."Shortening the backswing wasn't the only improvement. Goosen says they've worked hard to ensure he makes a better weight shift toward the target during the downswing. "I don't want to feel as if I'm hanging back. I want to feel as if the right side of my body is moving into the ball a lot sooner. That feeling of 'covering the ball' helps me hit it solid and straight."Adds Jamieson: "He has great posture and balance, but sometimes he's a little farther behind the ball at impact than at address. When he gets his weight over to the left side, he's as good with the driver as he is with his irons."-- Ron Kaspriske

Keeping his head centered in his stance -- instead of farther behind the ball -- stops Retief from falling back.

Look how stable his left foot is in the next few frames. He's in balance.

As a result of a fracture in 1999, Retief's left arm stays bent until past impact.

His swing is intentionally shorter now and a lot easier to control.

He has great posture and balance, but sometimes he's a little farther behind the ball at impact than at address. When he gets his weight over to the left side, he's as good with the driver as he is with his irons.

I like that he's on plane and maintaining his spine angle.

His backswing used to be much longer, but he's shortened it for more control.

He has maintained his head position to this point nicely: He's staying with the shot.

He has maintained his head position to this point nicely: He's staying with the shot.

His shoulders are on line with the target, but his hips are open. This is a real power move.

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