Courses

Best golf courses near Columbus, OH

Below, you’ll find a list of courses near Columbus, OH. There are 53 courses within a 15-mile radius of Columbus, 25 of which are public courses and 28 are private courses. There are 38 18-hole courses and 15 nine-hole layouts.

The above has been curated through Golf Digest’s Places to Play course database, where we have collected star ratings and reviews from our 1,900 course-ranking panelists. Join our community by signing up for Golf Digest+ and rate the courses you’ve visited recently.

Scioto Country Club
Private
Scioto Country Club
Columbus, OH
4.7
82 Panelists
The Donald Ross design at Scioto was the site of three prominent tournaments—the 1926 U.S. Open, won by Bobby Jones, the 1931 Ryder Cup and the 1950 PGA Championship (Chandler Harper). That course was gone by the time the ’68 U.S. Amateur came to Scioto (Bruce Fleischer), replaced in 1963 by a modern design from Dick Wilson who delegated one nine to associate Joe Lee and the other to associate Robert von Hagge. Several other renovations by Michael Hurdzan and Jack Nicklaus, who grew up playing the course, followed in the 2000s creating yet a third iteration of the course. Enough, the club said. They hired Andrew Green in 2021 to restore the course to the full Donald Ross version based on drawings, photos and an old aerial illustration from the '26 Open. Green lowered green complexes, emboldened contours, recreated Ross’ sharp-faced bunkering and returned the small green at the par-3 17th to the near side of a creek where it originally was.
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Columbus Country Club: Championship
4.1
56 Panelists
The Championship Course at Columbus Country Club is one of the best courses in Ohio. Discover our experts' reviews and where Columbus Country Club ranks in our rankings
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The Ohio State University Golf Club: Scarlet
4
66 Panelists
Augusta National and Cypress Point architect Alister MacKenzie originally designed Ohio State’s Scarlet course in 1931, but he died in 1934 before construction began. After his death, Perry Maxwell oversaw the construction, though the course is still considered a MacKenzie layout. Jack Nicklaus returned to his collegiate course in 2005-2006 to restore the bunkers and lengthen the course to over 7,400 yards. The bunkers are some of the most penal in college golf, many massive in size and most with tall lips, often requiring high-lofted clubs to get back in play. The greens often play quite firm, making it difficult to hold approach shots close to some hole locations. The Ohio track regularly plays as one of the toughest courses on the Korn Ferry Tour when it hosts an annual event during the tour’s finals series. The course is semi-private and open to those who have an affiliation with Ohio State University.
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Brookside Golf and Country Club
Private
Brookside Golf and Country Club
Columbus, OH
3.7
53 Panelists
Architect Brian Silva put an entirely new twist on this 1927 design by rebuilding and expanding greens, shifting classical-era-inspired bunkers to more consequential locations, thinning trees and adding a newly conceived par 3. The transformation pushes this club into the first tier of a competitive Columbus golf market that includes 100 Greatest mainstays like Muirfield Village, The Golf Club, Scioto and Double Eagle.
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Muirfield Village Golf Club
Private
Muirfield Village Golf Club
Dublin, OH
4.9
172 Panelists
This is the course that Jack built, and rebuilt, and rebuilt again and again. Since its opening in 1974, Jack Nicklaus has remodeled every hole at Muirfield Village, some more than once, using play at the PGA Tour’s annual Memorial Tournament for some guidance. The most recent renovation in 2020 was one of the most extensive and included the rebuilding of every hole, the shifting of greens and tees, strategic changes to the iconic par 5s and a new, more player-friendly par3 16th. That’s how a championship course remains competitive. But with every change, Nicklaus always made sure the general membership could still play and enjoy the course as well. The latest word is that Nicklaus is still not happy with the 16th hole and has plans for yet another version.
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The Golf Club
Private
The Golf Club
New Albany, OH
4.5
299 Panelists
The Golf Club, built in 1966, may be the most authentic of Pete Dye’s transition period of design, when he first chose to buck convention and start building lay-of-the-land layouts like those he’d seen during a 1963 tour of Scotland. In doing so, Dye re-introduced deception, misdirection and railroad ties into American golf architecture. Its construction attracted the attention of local boy Jack Nicklaus, who visited several times and made some astute suggestions. That led to a five-year Dye-Nicklaus design partnership. The Golf Club remained untouched for nearly 45 years, until 2014, when Pete Dye returned to rebuild holes, modestly adjusting some of his original green contours to better match them to present-day green speeds. He also relocated the fifth green, adding a contorted putting surface more reminiscent of his later designs, an inconspicuous reminder how much his design pedilictions evolved throughout his career.
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Wedgewood Golf & Country Club: Wedgewood
4.1
23 Panelists
From Golf Digest Architecture Editor emeritus Ron Whitten: Of the two residential courses Robert Trent Jones Jr. created around Columbus, Ohio in the early 1990s, Wedgewood Golf & Country Club in the northwest suburb of Powell has always been considered the better of the two. Nothing wrong with Jefferson Golf & Country Club, but it's the more obvious residential development course. Wedgewood is a lot more compact, a core course with homesites mostly around the perimeter and most holes separated from one another by portions of forest. Bruce Charlton, then an associate, now a partner in the firm of Robert Trent Jones II, was the onsite architect on both jobs. He told me when I played both courses with him way back in 1992 that he and Jones were tickled to work in Columbus, home of architects Jack Nicklaus and Mike Hurdzan, among many others. "Columbus is literally a museum of great architecture," Bruce said, citing classics like Scioto, Muirfield Village and The Golf Club. Now they would be part of that museum. Wedgewood has been ranked by Golf Digest among the Best Courses in Ohio, but it has never quite contended for a spot on the 100 Greatest. It's hard to say why; the course is certainly lovely, with bent fairways slivering through those acres of hardwood trees, and it's certainly tough, as those corridors between trees are narrow. Back in the 1990s, corridors were created to be just 40 yards wide, and over the ensuing years, growing tree canopies have made them play even tighter. When I recently toured the course, I was reminded of how masterfully the creeks that flow across the property were used in the design. There's a creek gulley in front of the second green, with the creek piped underground at that point, but then it emerges on the dogleg-left third. That hole is considered the toughest on the course, with the creek twisting down the left side of the fairway, then cutting across short of the green to hug the right side of the putting surface. On the par-5 sixth, another splendid golf hole, two separate streams converge about 160 yards short of the green. The resulting single stream then bisects the fairway and snakes down the right edge toward the tee, so both drives and second shots are complicated by that hazard. Wedgewood has some of the smallest greens I've ever played on a Robert Trent Jones Jr. design, and the bunkering isn't the flowery flashed-sand style we're used to seeing on his designs. These are mostly shallow ovals that deliberately give the course an old-fashioned look, especially the three imbedded in the hillside below the green on the par-3 11th. Guarded by yet another creek ravine, it looks like it could fit in at Scioto. At least, the old Scioto before it got all geometric on us. Diagonal oval cross-bunkers on the par-4 13th are so short off the tee that they're more gingerbread than trouble, but they do add an antiquated feel to the tee shot, from either of the two separate set of tee boxes on this hole. By the way, when I first played Wedgewood, I'm certain the 13th had only a single cross bunker; now there are three. If there is a flaw in Wedgewood's design, it's that both nines run counterclockwise, meaning the same conditions prevail for the entire 18. If the wind is from the north, for instance (which is opposite the prevailing wind), golfers will play into it both on the par-3 eighth and par-5 ninth as well as on the par-3 17th and par-5 18th. That's a pretty mild criticism for a design that I really admire.
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Pinnacle Golf Club: Pinnacle
Private
Pinnacle Golf Club: Pinnacle
Grove City, OH
3.8
21 Panelists
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The Club At Tartan Fields: Tartan Fields
3.7
32 Panelists
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York Golf Club: York
Private
York Golf Club: York
Columbus, OH
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