Slice fixApril 7, 2019

Butch Harmon's two-step slice fix

Two simple fixes for a better ball flight
Photo by J.D. Cuban

When I meet golfers who've been struggling with a slice since day one, I know I'm going to have some fun. Why? Because I can straighten their ball flight, even teach them to hit a draw, in a matter of minutes. Getting in the correct positions is easy. Beating a slice is ultimately about commitment and good habits.

If you're like most slicers, the first fix you need is in the setup. Close your feet, hips and shoulders so they're pointing to the right of your target. This takes some faith because you're shifting in the direction you want to avoid. But a closed setup does two things: First, it makes it easier to turn back and complete the backswing. Second, it slows down your hip turn on the way through (above), which allows your hands and arms to drop to the inside and swing out to the ball—the first step to hitting a draw.

Photo by JD Cuban

Want more tips from Butch Harmon? Check out the Golf Digest Schools video lesson series he hosts, The Butch Harmon Swing Clinic.

Easy so far, right? Well, the next step flows from the first. From the top, focus on making a smooth body turn through impact; don't let your body spin open, as a lot of slicers do. (This is where the closed setup will help.) The key is, you want your arms to swing past your body, because your trail arm will roll over your lead arm, closing the clubface (above). That's the second step to hitting a draw.

So set your body closed, and let your arms go past you. You'll love what you see.

WHEN IN DOUBT, BENCH THE DRIVER

There's nothing impressive about grab-bing your driver on a tight hole if you end up flaring it into the junk. Taking a more lofted club makes good sense because more loft means less curve. So the same impact with a driver versus, say, a 5-wood can be the difference between having a shot to the green and being out of play. Hybrids are good choices, too, because they fly higher and land softer than fairway woods and long irons. Point is, don't let your ego win.

BUTCH HARMON is a Golf Digest Teaching Professional.