InstructionDecember 1, 2014

How He Hit That: Jordan Spieth's wind-proof swing

Any PGA Tour player has the skill to go really low. But some low rounds are held in more esteem than others, and Jordan Spieth's Sunday 63 to win the Australian Open is one of them.

It wasn't just the eight birdies Spieth made against no bogeys at the Australian Golf Club in Sydney. The 21-year-old American did it in high winds against extremely difficult hole locations, when 67 was the next best score. Spieth called it the best round he'd ever played, and he quickly outpaced Greg Chalmers and Brett Rumford, with whom he was tied for the lead after three rounds. Spieth ended up winning by six and moved to 11th in the world rankings.

"Jordan Spieth doesn't have the most conventional swing in terms of what you see on the PGA Tour, but the name of the game is controlling the ball, which is something he does very well," says top Louisiana teacher Shaun Webb, who is based at the David Toms Golf Academy in Shreveport. "Jordan makes a full turn at the top of his swing, but he does it without swaying his lower body to the right. This lets him transition correctly into the downswing and move in good sequence."

Spieth's elite ball-striking comes in part because he rotates both his upper and lower body so well through the downswing. "Most amateurs have the tendency to stop their body rotation leading into impact," Webb says. "That hurts accuracy and power and leads to mis-hits. Here, you can see how much more he's turned at impact than the average 20-handicapper, on the right."

"To get the feel of a good transition and improved body rotation in your swing, start without a ball and your feet together," Webb says. "Before you get to the top, step toward the target with your lead foot and swing through to the finish."

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