Outside the Box

Former MLB All-Star pitcher has two simple (and terrible) solutions to increase offense in baseball

February 8, 2019
Roy Oswalt
Icon Sports Wire

If you've been paying attention, you've seen the proposed rules changes the MLB and the Player's Association revealed earlier this week. For once, they didn't look that terrible, which is no small feat considering some of their recent history. Of course, they are still pushing for the rule that would allow teams to put a runner at second base in extra innings, which, and I cannot stress this enough, is the most embarrassing idea I've ever heard. It's quite fitting for my generation though. Nothing says millennial like being placed at second base without hitting a double.

Other than that flaming hot garbage idea, which they use in the minors, the other proposals are...dare I say...good. Universal DH? Suck it up you NL try-hard fans, it's going to happen, as it should. Added roster spot? Good. Twenty-second pitch clock? VERY good. Reducing mound visits? Good. Three-batter minimum? I'm a pretty big hater of this bull-penning craze, but I can see why some would be opposed.

All these proposals, I gather, are for improving pace of play and increasing offense. Whether or not they do remains to be seen, but it's fair to say all of the ideas are better than these two from former MLB All-Star pitcher Roy Oswalt, who clearly tweeted them out in jest:

Honestly, who says no? Aluminum bats, while they could probably get a few people killed, would send balls literally out of stadiums. Plus, if the players juice AND use aluminum bats, basically just making contact would get the ball over the wall. The game is all about home runs now, right? I see nothing wrong with Oswalt's proposals. You fans want excitement? A lot of home runs and the possibility of death at every pitch should do the trick. Roy Oswalt is a visionary.

RELATED: MLB pitcher Archie Bradley tells the story of how he—literally—sh*t his pants on his way to the mound

MORE FROM THE LOOP
Monday Superlatives

Could hockey ever become cool again in America?

April 22, 2019