My Usual GameSeptember 30, 2014

Two Ryder Cup shots you didn't see on TV

You didn't see them because they happened in a different Ryder Cup, the one the Sunday Morning Group held while the American tour stars were getting whupped in Scotland. Twenty-four guys signed up in advance, and Corey, our pro, divided us into two teams. The youngest guy in the field didn't show, apparently because he had met someone interesting in a bar the night before. Corey took his place, after persuading his mother, our club's immediate past president, to watch the golf shop for him. (The guy who didn't show made a big mistake, in my opinion. The time to establish golf in a romantic relationship is at the beginning, before the non-playing party has had time to develop a case.)

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We played six four-ball matches, and each was worth a point. We also had our normal Sunday-morning skins and the Money Hole -- something the PGA of America ought to consider for 2016. Tom Watson should listen up, too, because in our matches the American team won, 4-2. That's the only time in history, I'm pretty sure, that an SMG special event has failed to predict the outcome of whatever real thing it was pretending to be. (In the past, we've successfully called two national elections and a Super Bowl.)

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Before I get to the two shots that weren't shown on TV, I'd like to make two general observations about the other Ryder Cup:

  1. What is the source of Ryder Cup Europe's pathological golf-course selections? In the sixties and seventies, the trans-Atlantic side of the contest was held exclusively on Open courses: Royal Lytham & St. Annes, Royal Birkdale, and Muirfield -- an over-reliance on England, granted, but otherwise impeccable. Since then, the thinking has apparently been that crummy venues deserve international exposure, too. The worst is the Belfry, also in England, which has hosted the matches four times -- more than any other course in history. The Belfry has just two good holes, the ninth and the eighteenth, and most matches don't reach the eighteenth. This year's course, at Gleneagles, was in the works when I first played golf in Scotland, in the early 1990s. At that time, the Scots had seemingly decided that the way to attract American golfers was to hire Jack Nicklaus to build something that would remind them of Florida, cart paths included. Somebody, please, wake up the people in charge. The PGA Centenary Course, as Nicklaus's creation is now known, isn't even the best course at Gleneagles.

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  1. There's been lots of angry speculation about the reasons for this year's American defeat, but no one, so far as I know, has hit on the real explanation: the extraordinarily annoying pre-shot routines of Jim Furyk and Keegan Bradley. In TV broadcasts of regular tour events, producers have become adept at keeping the cameras away from those two until they're almost ready to make a real stroke. During the Ryder Cup, though, so little actual golf is under way at any moment that they had no choice but to make us watch full sequences -- all the tics and twirls and feints and bird peeks and pocket scrunches and everything else. True, we were spared Furyk's 5-Hour Energy wardrobe, and thank goodness for that. But the other stuff was increasingly infuriating, and by Saturday afternoon (I'm guessing) so many U.S. TV watchers were mentally rooting against Furyk and Bradley that the cosmic tide irretrievably turned. Those two golfers, between them, won two points and lost four; turn those Ls to Ws, and it's a blowout the other way

Now, back to the other Ryder Cup. The two shots you haven't seen were both hit by Doug, who was my partner. In each case, he went on to triple- or even quadruple-bogey the hole. But that was OK because I had him covered.

MyUsualGame

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