Throwback ThursdayJune 9, 2016

What you need to know about the U.S. Open scoring record (and why it's safe this year)

With mighty Oakmont as U.S. Open site next week, it is not expected there will be any scoring records set, Johnny Miller’s epic 63 in 1973 notwithstanding. Having held eight prior Opens, Oakmont has seen the winner finish over par three times, and added together, the eight winning scores are nine over par, producing a winning-score average in the black.

But 2016 is an anniversary year for three milestones in U.S. Open scoring: Alex Smith was the first champion to break 300 with 295 in 1906; Chick Evans was the first to break 290 with 286 in 1916; and Tony Manero was the first to break 285 with 282 in 1936

For context, here the timeline for the landmark scoring progression at the Open. Interestingly, the longest a scoring record held up was 272 for 31 years until Rory McIlroy shot 268 at a soggy Congressional in 2011.

On Sept. 14-15, 1899, Willie Smith was the first to break 320 with 315 at Baltimore C.C. Harry Vardon broke that record score in 1900 but his 310 wasn’t broken until …

Oct. 10-11, 1902, by Laurie Auchterlonie with 307 at Garden City G.C. His record was bettered two years later but 300 wasn’t broken until …

June 28-29, 1906, by Alex Smith with 295 at the Onwentsia Club. His record was bettered three years later but 290 wasn’t broken until …

2006 AP

June 27-30, 1916, by Chick Evans (above) with 286 at the Minikahda Club outside Minneapolis. His record score held up until it was tied in 1932. It was then broken (and 285 surpassed as well) on…

June 4-6, 1936, by Tony Manero with 282 at Baltusrol G.C. His record was bettered one year later but 280 wasn’t broken until …

June 10-12, 1948, by Ben Hogan with 276 at Riviera C.C. His record was bettered in 1967 but 275 wasn’t broken until …

June 12-15, 1980, by Jack Nicklaus with 272 at Baltusrol. His record score was tied three times but 270 wasn’t broken until …

June 16-19, 2011, by Rory McIlroy with 268 at the Blue course at Congressional, which is the present record for low score.


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