My Usual GameSeptember 15, 2014

I don't get blisters anymore, but if I did. . . .

Golf shoes by True Linkswear, a company for which I am an unpaid shill, are so comfortable that I now wear one or another of my many pairs not just when I play golf but also almost any time I can't get away with being barefoot. My favorite model at the moment is the "lyt dry" (I don't pick the names). Here's what they looked like on my feet at the men's member-guest, back in August:

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I'm also quite fond of a similar model, called "vegas." (Again, I wasn't asked.) Here's what those look like:

truevegas.jpg

My very first True golf shoes were a little like clown feet, or flippers, but they were so ridiculously comfortable that I didn't mind. Recent models have been more shoe-like, in both appearance and construction; some of the latest ones even have heels. That's a good thing if you want to wear golf shoes when you go out to dinner with your wife, as I do, but it's mildly worrisome if the thing you loved most about your first pairs was that they felt like bedroom slippers. I'm just going to trust True's designers not to go overboard with the conventional-shoe stuff, and to keep working on whatever technology they use to make the waterproof models waterproof -- a technology that, in my opinion, they haven't perfected.

I haven't had a single blister since switching to Trues -- not even on the two days when my friends and I played more than a hundred holes between sunrise and sunset. If I ever do get a blister, or feel a blister coming on, however, I know exactly what I'll do: cover it immediately with a Band-Aid Advanced Healing blister pad:

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The pads are actually manufactured by a Danish company, and are called Compeed everywhere but in the United States. (The company also makes pads for corns and cold sores.) Each one contains a "hydrocolloidal" gel, which both acts as a cushion and draws moisture from the affected area, helping it to heal. Ideally, you leave the pad on until it falls off -- and it stays stuck, even in the shower, and doesn't slide around the way an ordinary bandage does. I carry several in my golf bag, and issue them to whimpering friends.

My wife uses them with her new hockey skates, which she's still breaking in. She also uses another Band-Aid blister product, called a Friction Block Stick, as a blister preventative:

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It's basically Crisco in a plastic applicator, as near as I can tell. (The main ingredient is hydrogenated vegetable oil.) But my wife says it works.

MyUsualGame

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