News & ToursSeptember 28, 2014

Europe's teamwork reigns supreme, and its stronghold on the Ryder Cup was never in doubt

This is getting monotonous, but only one suspects for the American teams who can't seem to find a way to win a Ryder Cup. For the eighth time in the last ten biennial contests between Worlds Old and New, the famous old trophy will spend the next two years residing on the starboard side of the Atlantic Ocean. To the tune of 16 1/2 -- 11 1/2, the European side saw off the visitors at Gleneagles in Scotland.

It was, sad to say for captain Tom Watson and his charges, a result that was never really in doubt. Firm pre-match favorites, the Europeans underlined their on-paper superiority once play began on the grass covering the PGA Centenary course. Two points ahead after day one, four in front after two days, captain Paul McGinley's men eventually won by five. Statistically at least, it was an inexorable performance from the 12-man home team.

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There were many heroes to be acknowledged.

Graeme McDowell took the top-singles match against Jordan Spieth by 2&1 (after being three down at the turn) to complete a 100 percent record from his three matches.

Justin Rose played five times, was unbeaten in all and so was top-scorer on either side.

Rory McIlroy made seven birdies and an eagle en route to beating Rickie Fowler by 5&4 and lost only once in five games.

Frenchman Victor Dubuisson emulated McDowell's unbeaten feat -- the pair won twice in foursomes -- when he battled Zach Johnson to a half in the final match on the course.

Sergio Garcia, previously off-color, repeated his one-hole victory at Medinah over Jim Furyk and provided a vital 2 ¿ points overall.

Only one European, Scotland's lone representative Stephen Gallacher, emerged from the three-day contest without registering at least half a point. It was truly a team performance.

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More happily, the winning point was achieved in some style. Four up with four to play and having already guaranteed Europe's retention of the trophy, 38-year old Welsh rookie Jamie Donaldson "stiffed" his approach to the par-4 15th green to finish off both Keegan Bradley and America's chances.

It was a fitting conclusion to yet another amazing Ryder Cup contest.

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