My Usual GameMay 29, 2016

Jason Day tests world's greatest golf-course feature

This past Monday, Bob G., an honorary member of the Sunday Morning Group, invited Peter A., Hacker (real name), and me to join him for a round at his home course, GlenArbor Golf Club, in Bedford Hills, New York. We arrived before Bob did, and when I went into the locker room to take a whiz I noticed that one of the lockers had been reserved for someone named Jason Day.

Amazingly, that Jason Day turned out to be the real Jason Day, the No. 1 player in the world. Nobody at the club had mentioned anything about it to Bob, but Day was there to take part in an outing conducted by one of his sponsors, RBC, the Royal Bank of Canada.

The outing consisted of 32 youngish banker types, and the format was a shamble -- a best-ball competition in which every player in a foursome plays his or her own ball from the foursome's best tee shot. Day joined each group for one hole. Here he is, hitting a shot on a hole next to a lake:

That's not Day on the right, standing in the hazard; that's Hacker, recovering from an unfortunate drive. Day is on the left, under the red arrow. We got a closer look at him when he and the final RBC foursome played the eighteenth, a 414-yard par 4. The second half of that hole plays almost vertically up a steep hill, toward the clubhouse. Day had to hit is tee shot from the way-back tee, but his drive still flew miles beyond the other drives in the group. Naturally, his drive was the one they chose to use. Here he is, playing his second shot. (He hit it to about three feet, and made the putt).

You have to figure that Day's appearance was required by a contract he signed before he turned into Superman, but, even so, he seemed to be having a pretty good time. Here he is during lunch, as GlenArbor's director of golf was announcing things like the winner of the closest-to-the-pin contest:

Actually, I would bet that in some ways the outing was more fun for Day than it was for the bankers -- who, after all, were under enormous pressure not to shank, flub, chilly-dip, or yip their ball while the best player in the world stood a few feet away, watching:

We weren't part of the outing, so I couldn't do something I desperately wanted to do: grab a handful of soft-shell crabs from a big chafing dish on the buffet table. But we did get to try an awesome feature that GlenArbor added recently, right next to the terrace where the bankers were having drinks and eating lunch. Every golf club in the world should add one of these, even if they have to build a lake and a steep hill in order to do it:

Those are Pro V1s in the range basket. The tee and the floating green haven't been there for very long, but the director of golf told us that there are 60,000 balls in the lake already, and that a scuba diver will be coming soon to recover them. Here's Bob, trying his luck:

He missed the green, which is roughly the size of a doormat, but he came pretty close. Jason Day tried, too. Naturally, he stiffed it -- and, because he had, he said he wasn't going to push his luck by taking a second shot. He hit so fast that I didn't manage to get a picture until afterward, as he was heading back to his table:

Great player. Great course. Great floating green. Great afternoon.

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