My Usual GameJune 1, 2015

Is this the world's greatest golf course?

On Memorial Day weekend, I played Friday afternoon (lost five dollars), Saturday morning (came in third in a two-man scramble, playing with Tim), Saturday afternoon (advanced to the final in the member-member, also playing with Tim), Sunday morning (won six dollars), Monday morning (won low gross in the nine-hole Memorial Day mixed shamble, playing with Madeline -- my golf wife -- and an actually married couple), and Monday afternoon (lost five dollars). Then I played again on Friday (lost five dollars) and Saturday morning (won the member-member, one-up, playing with Tim.) That was a pretty good eight-day run, so I wasn't totally bummed when we had thunder, lightning, and heavy rain just before 7:00 the following morning.

wundermapam.jpg

I sent an email to the Sunday Morning Group saying I'd bring a couple of decks of playing cards, and Hacker (real name) suggested that we eat our cheeseburgers and hot dogs (supplied by Barney) for breakfast, instead of lunch. But the lightning had stopped by 7:30, so we played golf instead of setback. One very good thing about rain is that it scares away slackers: twenty regulars showed up, and we had the course to ourselves.

P1150667.JPG

Getting soaked was better than inhaling pine pollen -- something we've done a lot of this spring:

P1150687.JPG

Because I was up early on both Saturday and Sunday, before I left for the club I watched some of the Irish Open -- by which, of course, I mean the Dubai Duty Free Irish Open Hosted by the Rory Foundation. The D.D.F.I.O.H.R.F. was held this year on a course that many golfers would pick as the best in the world: Royal County Down, in Newcastle, Northern Ireland.

P1100527.JPG

Among its many memorable features are its bunkers, which are maintained by vengeful demons:

P1100739.JPG

During a round at Royal County Down in 2013, my playing partner and I waded into a jungle of whins and briers near the eleventh tee to look for a century-old relic that a caddie had told me about two years before: the remains of a small stone building, which the maintenance crew had uncovered during an aggressive gorse-removal project. We found it, at some risk to our clothing, although it was so overgrown that we couldn't see much more than one corner.

P1100734.JPG

Later that day, Harry McCaw -- a past captain of both Royal County Down and the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews -- told me that he thought the structure might once have served as the literal "club house": the place where early players stored their clubs.

P1100513.JPG

I had driven to Newcastle from Dublin, a hundred miles to the south, and during part of the trip I followed Mourne Coastal Route, a scenic highway. Irish roads are narrow under any circumstances; they become narrower if your eyes are repeatedly drawn to the hills and out to sea -- a danger that day, because the sky was so clear that I could see the Isle of Man, halfway to the English mainland.

P1100797.JPG

My parents once visited Ireland with another couple, and on an especially harrowing stretch of road my mother, who was sitting in the back seat with the other wife, yelled at my father to stop steering so close to the edge. He innocently raised both hands, to remind her that, in Ireland and the U.K., the driver sits on the right, not the left. During my own trip, I knocked the cowling off the passenger-side mirror of my rental car. I told the clerk at Avis when I returned the car, but she said it happened all the time, and not to worry about it.

P1100843.JPG

Will the Open Championship ever be held at Royal County Down? Fingers crossed.

MyUsualGame

More from The Loop