News & ToursApril 8, 2011

Crenshaw, Jackson make special walk again

AUGUSTA, Ga. -- As they came up the hill to the 18th green, Ben Crenshaw put his hand on Carl Jackson's back, a two-time Masters champion, in his 40th appearance, walking home with his caddie, in his 50th appearance. They've made that walk together the last 35 years. If this one were the last, and it may be, it was a wonderful moment, the men lit by the late afternoon's golden sun, applause washing over the two walking as one.

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*Crenshaw walks with Jackson to the 18th green. (Photo by David Cannon/Getty Images) *

"The people were so gracious today and so sweet to Carl," Crenshaw said. "They're so heartfelt, it's so heartfelt. They're seeing something that's not going to happen again. Carl's a huge part of this place."

Jackson was 14 when he first caddied at Augusta National. Crenshaw was 19 when he first played here. He won the tournament in 1984, with his father, Charlie, following in the gallery, and he won again, improbably, in 1995, the week of the death of his long-time mentor, Harvey Penick. That April, when the last putt fell in, Crenshaw bent nearly double in tears, his hands to his face, and Carl Jackson put his hand on his man's back.

Crenshaw's 77 on Friday, after his first-round 78, wasn't good enough to make the cut. At age 59, he may decide his playing time is done here. In the moments after the round, it seemed clear he could leave the work done as it has been done and have no regrets. "I've had a wonderful life just here at Augusta," he said. "My God, I spent a lot of my life here and have had a lot of great moments that are life-giving to me."

Ending it now, coming to the 18th with his man on the bag, both making the champion's walk up that hill, caps off in salute to the fans -- what more could a guy ask? "I don't know if quitting now will be that difficult, really," he said. "I've been really lucky."

-- Dave Kindred

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](http://blog.golfdigest.com/golf-tours-news/blogs/local-knowledge/assets_c/2011/04/110408_crenshaw_jackson_470-29862.html)

               Jackson was 14 when he first caddied at Augusta National. Crenshaw was 19 when he first played here. He won the tournament in 1984, with his father, Charlie, following in the gallery, and he won again, improbably, in 1995, the week of the death of his long-time mentor, Harvey Penick. That April, when the last putt fell in, Crenshaw bent nearly double in tears, his hands to his face, and Carl Jackson put his hand on his man's back.

Crenshaw's 77 on Friday, after his first-round 78, wasn't good enough to make the cut. At age 59, he may decide his playing time is done here. In the moments after the round, it seemed clear he could leave the work done as it has been done and have no regrets. "I've had a wonderful life just here at Augusta," he said. "My God, I spent a lot of my life here and have had a lot of great moments that are life-giving to me."

Ending it now, coming to the 18th with his man on the bag, both making the champion's walk up that hill, caps off in salute to the fans -- what more could a guy ask? "I don't know if quitting now will be that difficult, really," he said. "I've been really lucky."

-- Dave Kindred

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