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2018 AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am: Inside the bags of the celebrities

Along with the 156 professionals, this week at the 2018 AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am also sees 156 amateurs teeing it up alongside those who play for pay. Among that group are a number of people you probably never have heard of, but, as is custom for the tournament once known as the "Crosby Clambake," a handful of celebrities adorn the field. Here's a look at some of the more familiar faces, and the equipment they are using this week on the Monterey Peninsula—a mix of modern technology . . . and almost embarrassingly ancient equipment.

PEBBLE BEACH, CA - FEBRUARY 08: Aaron Rodgers plays his shot from the 16th tee during Round One of the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am at Spyglass Hill Golf Course on February 8, 2018 in Pebble Beach, California. (Photo by Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)
Mike Ehrmann

Aaron Rodgers is no joke on the golf course—holding a 5.7 index out of Green Bay Country Club. The NFL star didn’t post a score between August through December, but his GHIN reveals that he did fire a 72 last year (on a course with a 73.9 rating and 142 slope). Rodgers is playing with Jerry Kelly, a Wisconsin native, and Rodgers has some new gear in the bag this week—TaylorMade’s new M3 driver. Notice the weights moved toward the front. That’s a big boy move!

PEBBLE BEACH, CA - FEBRUARY 08: Bill Murray plays his shot on the seventh hole during Round One of the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am at Spyglass Hill Golf Course on February 8, 2018 in Pebble Beach, California. (Photo by Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)
Mike Ehrmann

Wow, Seriously Bill Murray? Look, we can understand the desire for a comfort club (we all have one, or two), but using a Titleist 910H 21-degree hybrid, a club that's almost a decade old, should be a little outside the "comfort zone." That club looks like it has been through the wars. Time to provide it an honorable discharge from your bag.

PEBBLE BEACH, CA - FEBRUARY 08: Tony Romo plays a bunker shot during the first round of the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am at Pebble Beach Golf Links, on February 8, 2018 in Pebble Beach, California. (Photo by Ryan Young/PGA TOUR)
Ryan Young

Everyone knows Tony Romo has game, both in the broadcast booth and on the golf course. Romo regularly tries to qualify for the U.S. Open and is a plus 0.3 Index at Dallas National and Trinity Forest in Texas. Romo’s wedges are also the preferred choice of the pros, Titleist’s Vokey SM7 model.

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PEBBLE BEACH, CA - FEBRUARY 08: Larry the Cable Guy plays his shot from the fourth tee during Round One of the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am at Spyglass Hill Golf Course on February 8, 2018 in Pebble Beach, California. (Photo by Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)
Mike Ehrmann

Yes, they even let lefties play in the Pro-Am as the presence of Larry the Cable Guy attests. The comedian’s choice of driver, Callaway’s Great Big Bertha Epic, shows even a good ol’ redneck can know their golf equipment.

PEBBLE BEACH, CA - FEBRUARY 07: Participant Kelly Rohrbach is seen during practice of the 3M Celebrity Challenge At The PGA Pebble Beach AT&T Pro AM at Pebble Beach Golf Links on February 7, 2018 in Pebble Beach, California. (Photo by C Flanigan/Getty Images)
C Flanigan

Supermodel and actress Kelly Rohrbach knows what she’s doing on the course (she’s a 7-handicap) but could obviously use some guidance with her equipment. Rohrbach is sporting a Callaway FT-5 driver at Pebble Beach—a club that debuted in 2007 and has a current trade-in value under $20. Throwback style is one thing, but the same doesn't apply to golf equipment. You're losing valuable distance and forgiveness by using a club that's more than 10 years old.

PEBBLE BEACH, CA - FEBRUARY 08: Toby Keith and Steve Stricker chat during the first round of the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am at Pebble Beach Golf Links, on February 8, 2018 in Pebble Beach, California. (Photo by Ryan Young/PGA TOUR)
Ryan Young

Country music star Toby Keith is paired with Steve Stricker at the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am and appears to be getting a little advice about his choice of putter from Strick. Keith is wielding a Scotty Cameron by Titleist Futura 7M mallet with a center shaft.

PEBBLE BEACH, CA - FEBRUARY 08: Larry Fitzgerald plays his shot from the 16th tee during Round One of the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am at Spyglass Hill Golf Course on February 8, 2018 in Pebble Beach, California. (Photo by Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)
Mike Ehrmann

Larry Fitzgerald owns a 10.6 Handicap Index out of Whisper Rock Golf Club in Arizona and has been busy since football season ended, posting all 20 rounds on his GHIN card in 2018. We’ve seen Fitzgerald play, and he can regularly bash it over 300 yards off the tee. His irons, however, are PXG’s more forgiving 0311XF model, giving the perennial Pro Bowler a little extra help on his approach shots.

PEBBLE BEACH, CA - FEBRUARY 10: Comedian Ray Romano tees off on the 1st hole during the 3M Celebrity Challenge prior to the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am at Pebble Beach Golf Links on February 10, 2016 in Pebble Beach, California. (Photo by Todd Warshaw/Getty Images)
Todd Warshaw

Everybody might love “Everyone Loves Raymond” star Ray Romano, but the comedian’s choice of fairway wood is a bit of a joke. He’s using Callaway’s X2 Hot fairway woods, a club that’s more than four years old. Hey Ray, we’ve heard Callaway has some new models out there.

PEBBLE BEACH, CA - FEBRUARY 07: Participant Josh Duhamel is seen during practice of the 3M Celebrity Challenge At The PGA Pebble Beach AT&T Pro AM at Pebble Beach Golf Links on February 7, 2018 in Pebble Beach, California. (Photo by C Flanigan/Getty Images)
C Flanigan

Actor Josh Duhamel obviously can afford quality sticks and he went upscale with his choice of PXG’s 0311 irons. Judging from this photo, he has the original model which features four weights in the toe area. The model was later revised to where it now only has three weights in that spot.

RELATED: As the face of the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am, Bill Murray draws his shares of critics. Here's why they're wrong