America's 100 Greatest Public: Most Expensive Golf Courses

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America's 100 Greatest Public: Most Expensive Golf Courses

May 04, 2011

Photo By: Golf Digest Resource Center

Photo By: Stephen Szurlej

Photo By: Jamie Squire/Getty Images

Photo By: Scott Halleran/Getty Images

Photo By: Robert Laberge/Getty Images

Photo By: Stephen Szurlej

Photo By: Stephen Szurlej

Photo By: Stephen Szurlej

Photo By: Stephen Szurlej

Shadow Creek Golf Course, Las Vegas ($500)This spectacular desert oasis designed by Tom Fazio is reserved mainly for the high rollers staying at the city's MGM Mirage properties. It has been ranked as high as No. 27 in Golf Digest's ranking of America's 100 Greatest Golf Courses.

Photo By: Golf Digest Resource Center

Pebble Beach Golf Links ($495)The price tag has always been steep, but this course, perhaps above all others, combines beauty and history. The site of five U.S. Opens and an annual PGA Tour event causes patrons to take as many photos as shots during a round with its breath-taking seaside views. At No. 6 on Golf Digest's America's 100 Greatest Courses, it is far and away the highest ranked course on this list.

Photo By: Stephen Szurlej

Pinehurst No. 2 ($389)This classic Donald Ross design is known for its table-top green complexes that have given amateurs and pros fits during numerous tournaments, including three major championships. Someone always emerges as a winner, though, like Michael Campbell (above) at the 2005 U.S. Open.

Photo By: Jamie Squire/Getty Images

Cascata Course, Boulder City, NV ($375)Located a half-hour south of Las Vegas, this track designed by "Open Doctor" Rees Jones still packs plenty of star power. Known as a site of numerous celebrity-stocked events, Cascata checks in at No. 61 on Golf Digest's list of America's 100 Greatest Public Golf Courses.

TPC Sawgrass Stadium Course ($375)The site of the Players Championship 1982, it has become arguably architect Pete Dye's most well-known work. The famed island green on the par-3 17th (above) sends approximately 100,000 golf balls a year to a watery grave.

Photo By: Scott Halleran/Getty Images

Cordevalle Golf Club, San Martin, CA ($360)Opened in 1999, this Robert Trent Jones Jr. course was built in a California valley and has a secluded feel as part of a surrounding private preserve. It should only become more popular since securing a PGA Tour stop, the Frys.com Open, in 2010.

Photo By: Robert Laberge/Getty Images

Spyglass Hill Golf Course, Pebble Beach, CA ($360)The opening stretch along the Monterey coast (No. 3 is pictured above) is spectacular, but the inland holes are just as good on this Robert Trent Jones Sr. design. Opened in 1966, it's part of the annual Pebble Beach National Pro-Am, most notably in 2005 when Phil Mickelson set the course record with a 62.

Photo By: Stephen Szurlej

French Lick Resort (Pete Dye), French Lick, IN ($350)The finishing two holes of the Dye design that opened in 2009 are shown above. Despite being the youngest course on this list, it's already one of the most highly-regarded, having debuted at No. 18 in Golf Digest's list of America's 100 Greatest Public Courses.

Photo By: Stephen Szurlej

Whistling Straits (Straits Course), Kohler, Wisc. ($340)Perhaps this Pete Dye design is best known for its countless (some have estimated more than 1,000) bunkers. Dustin Johnson found this out the hard way at the 2010 PGA Championship when he mistakenly grounded his club in one of them on the 72nd hole and was penalized, dropping him out of a playoff.

Photo By: Stephen Szurlej

Kiawah Island (Ocean Course), Kiawah Island, S.C. ($338)This Pete Dye masterpiece gained instant fame by hosting the 1991 Ryder Cup, AKA "The War by the Shore." It will also be the site of the 2012 PGA Championship, so at least it has major-championship distinction to go along with a major price tag.

Photo By: Stephen Szurlej

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