Your Guide to Breaking 80

1 of 4

Lesson 1: Developing a Stock Shot

videobreakdown
Lesson 1: Developing a Stock Shot
overviewswing thoughtsdrills

OVERVIEW

Having a go-to shot you can play with confidence will help you structure your driving and iron play. It could be a draw or a fade, whichever works best for you. In this video, Kyle Morris shares the most effective ways to develop your own stock shot. He also discusses some of the technical swing flaws that typically hold players back. Here you’ll learn how to practice your shot and groove it for the golf course.

SWING THOUGHTS

For full swings, make sure you have some spine tilt away from the target at address
email
On the backswing, turn your hips in place and let your weight shift to your right instep
email
As you start down, keep your back to the target as long as you can
email
On the downswing, swing your arms back in front of your body without your right shoulder moving out toward the ball
email
At impact, feel like you’re turning the knuckles of your top hand to the ground
email
As you swing through, match up your arms and lower body so they move through together
email

DRILLS

Through the Gate

  • Stick two alignment rods in the ground about a yard apart and several yards down your target line.
  • One rod should be directly on the target line, the other on the side where you should start your ball based on your normal curve—right side for a draw; left side for a fade.
  • Hit balls through the “gate,” and try to start each shot at the outside alignment rod (right one for a draw; left one for a fade) and curve it toward the target without over-curving.

Feedback Drill

  • Stick an alignment rod in the ground at an angle toward you so that the top of the rod touches the tops of your wrists at setup.
  • Then take one step toward the target, staying in your setup position, and place a tee in the ground to mark the spot where the ball will be.
  • Hit some full shots from this practice station.
  • If you swing back properly, your hands will move just inside the rod. If you bump the rod coming down, your swing is steep and out to in. Your goal is to miss it in both directions.

The Wall Drill

  • Get in your setup with a wall one arm’s length to your left.
  • Prop up a club or umbrella vertically in front of you with your left hand.
  • Mimic a small backswing with your right arm only and then swing through under your left arm, trying to reach the wall with your right hand.
  • Holding the object with your left hand will keep your shoulders from rotating open as you swing through. Your hips should turn open freely, and your weight should be on your front foot—that’s how your body should feel at impact in your normal swing.
 Lesson 2: Dialing in Your Long Game
2Lesson 2: Dialing in Your Long Game
  • The keys to hitting more fairways
  • How to calculate shot-specific yardages
  • The intersection of power and control
  • Scoring strategies for the long game

Your Guide to Breaking 80

Lesson
1/4
Lesson 1: Developing a Stock Shot
2/4
Lesson 2: Dialing in Your Long Game
3/4
Lesson 3: Organizing Your Short Game
4/4
Lesson 4: Getting Ready for a Round
Your Guide to Breaking 80INDEX
Lesson 1: Developing a Stock Shot
1/4
Lesson 1: Developing a Stock Shot
  • Learn to control your shot pattern
  • Drills for establishing a go-to shot
  • Fixing common swing flaws
  • Self-tests to monitor your progress
 Lesson 2: Dialing in Your Long Game
2/4
Lesson 2: Dialing in Your Long Game
  • The keys to hitting more fairways
  • How to calculate shot-specific yardages
  • The intersection of power and control
  • Scoring strategies for the long game
Lesson 3: Organizing Your Short Game
3/4
Lesson 3: Organizing Your Short Game
  • Avoiding sloppy greenside play
  • A step-by-step routine for picking your shot
  • What “bounce” is and why you need it
  • How to read lies around the greens
Lesson 4: Getting Ready for a Round
4/4
Lesson 4: Getting Ready for a Round
  • Why you should start and end with putting
  • Creating a feel and rhythm for the day
  • What never to do before a round
  • Making the transition from range to course