GOLF DIGEST SCHOOLS

The Four-Corner Swing, by Jim McLean

1  of  4

Lesson 1: First Corner

video breakdown

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OVERVIEW SWING THOUGHTS

OVERVIEW

Jim McLean’s discussion of the key positions, or “corners,” of the golf swing begins with the transition, where the backswing ends and the downswing begins. In this video, McLean explains what you need to know about loading up at the top and starting down. With the body, arms and club in good position here, you can make an athletic move down to the ball.

SWING THOUGHTS

Finish the backswing with your shoulder turn; no lifting
To start the downswing, shift your lower body toward the target
Drive forward with your legs as your hands are still going back
Let the clubhead drop to the inside at the start down
Lesson 2: Second Corner
2 Lesson 2: Second Corner
  • Check your weight shift toward the target
  • Slotting the club into the delivery position
  • How to stop the disastrous early release
  • Simple drills for improving impact

The Four-Corner Swing, by Jim McLean

2  of  4

Lesson 2: Second Corner

video breakdown

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OVERVIEW SWING THOUGHTS

OVERVIEW

Once you’ve perfected the transition, the second corner of the swing—the delivery position—comes next. Here, Jim McLean breaks down the move into the ball, including the weight shift, how the arms drop from the top, and what the club should look like coming into impact. Groove the right positions here, and you’re all set for the strike.

SWING THOUGHTS

Let your arms drop from the top of the swing; don’t pull them down
As you start down, lower your trail shoulder, keeping your head in place
Maintain your wrist hinge during the first half of the downswing
At halfway down, almost all of your weight should be on your front foot
As the club approaches impact, the shaft should parallel the target line
Lesson 3: Third Corner
3 Lesson 3: Third Corner
  • Syncing your arms and body through impact
  • The magic of practicing the punch
  • What a real release looks and feels like
  • Why “staying down” is the wrong advice

The Four-Corner Swing, by Jim McLean

3  of  4

Lesson 3: Third Corner

video breakdown

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OVERVIEW SWING THOUGHTS

OVERVIEW

Most golfers put too much focus on impact and, as a result, hit at the ball instead of swinging through it. In this video, McLean explains why a full extension through the ball is critical. He looks at how the body and arms stay connected and how to push off the ground to boost power. Work on achieving a good extension position, and your ball-striking will naturally improve.

SWING THOUGHTS

Push off the ground through impact to increase your explosiveness
Let your forearms rotate naturally through impact; no flipping your hands
Don’t tense up your arms through impact and try to hold the face square
Feel your upper arms staying close to your body in the follow-through
Keep turning so the club is in front of your chest at halfway through
Lesson 4: Fourth Corner
4 Lesson 4: Fourth Corner
  • The key position that fixes many others
  • Matching your follow-through to your backswing
  • Checking body position and balance
  • No more “chicken wing” or “sack of laundry”

The Four-Corner Swing, by Jim McLean

4  of  4

Lesson 4: Fourth Corner

video breakdown

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OVERVIEW SWING THOUGHTS

OVERVIEW

If you’ve mastered the first three corners of the golf swing, you might feel like you’ve got it all figured out. But getting to a tall, balanced position as you approach the finish can prevent a lot of mistakes earlier in the swing. Here, McLean demonstrates how to extend your body and release your arms. Think of this position as a mirror image of the top of the backswing.

SWING THOUGHTS

Swing the club left of your body into the finish, with your trail wrist flat
As your hands move out and up, keep some space between your elbows
Turn your body all the way through so your belt buckle faces the target
As you swing through, stretch out your body—hips high, shoulders tall
Let your lead arm fold behind you to the finish position

The Four-Corner Swing, by Jim McLean

Lesson
1 / 4
Lesson 1: First Corner
2 / 4
Lesson 2: Second Corner
3 / 4
Lesson 3: Third Corner
4 / 4
Lesson 4: Fourth Corner
The Four-Corner Swing, by Jim McLean INDEX
Lesson 1: First Corner
1/4
Lesson 1: First Corner
  • Getting loaded properly in the backswing
  • What starts the downswing—and when
  • How to “turn the corner” at the top
  • The secret pro move at the transition
  • Getting loaded properly in the backswing
  • What starts the downswing—and when
  • How to “turn the corner” at the top
  • The secret pro move at the transition
Lesson 2: Second Corner
2/4
Lesson 2: Second Corner
  • Check your weight shift toward the target
  • Slotting the club into the delivery position
  • How to stop the disastrous early release
  • Simple drills for improving impact
  • Check your weight shift toward the target
  • Slotting the club into the delivery position
  • How to stop the disastrous early release
  • Simple drills for improving impact
Lesson 3: Third Corner
3/4
Lesson 3: Third Corner
  • Syncing your arms and body through impact
  • The magic of practicing the punch
  • What a real release looks and feels like
  • Why “staying down” is the wrong advice
  • Syncing your arms and body through impact
  • The magic of practicing the punch
  • What a real release looks and feels like
  • Why “staying down” is the wrong advice
Lesson 4: Fourth Corner
4/4
Lesson 4: Fourth Corner
  • The key position that fixes many others
  • Matching your follow-through to your backswing
  • Checking body position and balance
  • No more “chicken wing” or “sack of laundry”
  • The key position that fixes many others
  • Matching your follow-through to your backswing
  • Checking body position and balance
  • No more “chicken wing” or “sack of laundry”