Courses

Best golf courses near Alpharetta, GA

Below, you’ll find a list of courses near Alpharetta, GA. There are 63 courses within a 15-mile radius of Alpharetta, 26 of which are public courses and 37 are private courses. There are 45 18-hole courses and 16 nine-hole layouts.

The above has been curated through Golf Digest’s Places to Play course database, where we have collected star ratings and reviews from our 1,900 course-ranking panelists. Join our community by signing up for Golf Digest+ and rate the courses you’ve visited recently.

The Golf Club of Georgia: Creekside
Private
The Golf Club of Georgia: Creekside
Alpharetta, GA
4
37 Panelists
The Creekside course has one of the most peripatetic routings imaginable. Peripatetic means "traveling from place to place" and that's what the course does, moving one direction through pine preserves, traveling 200 yards through the trees and emerging somewhere else, then jumping across a wetland to yet another parcel of land, and so on. Eventually you're lost. That's part of the course's mystique, the ability to turn golfers in circles and seclude them from the bustle of the surrounding north Atlanta suburbs. But there is a lot of jumping around, as in, repeatedly hitting drives and approaches over the creeks and wetlands to islands of turf and then driving around them to see where they ended up. Creekside is not for the weak player or one who struggles to get the ball airborn. Work has been done recently to create more landing space, including at the par 5 fifth that used to require a 200-yard carry to reach the fairway, and then another 200+ yard shot over wetlands to reach a small second fairway, followed by a third shot across the axis of one of the shallowest greens on the course with a ravine behind it.
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Capital City Club: Crabapple
Private
Capital City Club: Crabapple
Alpharetta, GA
4
62 Panelists
Capital City Club, one of the oldest in Atlanta, opened their new Crabapple course in the far northern suburbs in 2002, and a year later it hosted the WGC American Express, won by Tiger Woods. The course sits on a vast property with no intrusion of development or homes other than the clubhouse, and though a treeless wetlands runs through the center of the course, the surrounding space gave Tom Fazio and his team room to explore. That freedom provides the course a look and playability that's distinct from almost all other courses in the market, moving in and out of different ecosystems with a minimal of hill-climbing. Crabapple excels is in this layout varietty, with holes running through pines and hardwoods and others canvassing the fields surrounding eight through ten and 15 through 18. There are split-level fairways, a drivable downhill par 4, par 3s that range from pitching wedge to long iron and a great closing trio of holes that include a reachable par 5 and two back-breaking par 4s. Though details are vague, rumor is that the entire course is going to be rebuilt soon by Fazio, including the instalation of sub-surface air systems.
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The Golf Club of Georgia: Lakeside
Private
The Golf Club of Georgia: Lakeside
Alpharetta, GA
4
64 Panelists
Arthur Hills had a productive run in Atlanta from the late 1980s throug the early '90s building five new courses that set a new tone for premium golf in the city, both public and private. His marquee design was the Lakeside Course at the 36-hole Golf Club of Georgia north of the city, winner of the Best New Private Course in 1991. The lake in question is Lake Windward, which Hills used as a jagged shoreline hazard for holes 11 through 14. Another body of water, the pond in front of the 18th green, played a role in determining the outcome of several Nationwide Championships, a Senior PGA Tour event played at the course from 1995 to 2000.
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Rivermont Golf Club: Rivermont
Private
Rivermont Golf Club: Rivermont
Alpharetta, GA
3.7
16 Panelists
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Peachtree Golf Club
Private
Peachtree Golf Club
Atlanta, GA
4.9
194 Panelists
The design collaboration by amateur star Bobby Jones and golf architect Robert Trent Jones (no relation) was meant to recapture the magic that the Grand Slam winner had experienced when he teamed with Alister Mackenzie in the design of Augusta National. But Trent was an even more forceful personality than the flamboyant Mackenzie, so Peachtree reflects far more of Trent’s notions of golf than Bobby’s, particularly in designing for future equipment advances. When it opened, Peachtree measured in excess of 7,200 yards, extremely long for that era. It boasted the longest set of tees in America (to provide flexibility on holes) and the country’s most enormous greens (to spread out wear and tear). As it turns out, Trent was a visionary, and decades later other designers followed his lead to address advances in club and ball technology.
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Atlanta Athletic Club: Highlands
Private
Atlanta Athletic Club: Highlands
Johns Creek, GA
No course on our rankings has highlighted the value of new turfgrasses better than the Highlands Course at Atlanta Athletic Club. It sets the standards for quality everyday conditions as well as for major championships at Southern venues. Its tees and fairways are newly-developed Zorro Zoysia, which can withstand Atlanta’s coldest winter days. Greens are state-of-the-art TifEagle Bermuda, smooth and pure. Approaches and surrounds of greens are TifGrand Bermuda, which allows them to be mowed very tight for additional bounce. The rough is Tifway 419 Bermuda, a great old standby. The club also recently upgraded its irrigation system. Because each turf has different water demands, a precise individual-head system was installed, each head controlled by the superintendent with a smart phone app, applying moisture only where needed and thus saving water and money. No longer will an errant shot at AAC land behind an irrigation box. There are none anymore.
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Atlanta Athletic Club: Riverside
Private
Atlanta Athletic Club: Riverside
Johns Creek, GA
4.2
76 Panelists
Robert Trent Jones built 27 holes for the Atlanta Athletic Club when it moved from East Lake in Atlanta to the northern suburb of Duluth (now called Johns Creek) in the late 1960s. When Joe Finger added a fourth nine on a high section of the property in the early 70s, the holes were broken into two 18-hole courses, the Highlands Course, host of the 1976 U.S. Open and 2001 and 2011 PGA Championships, and the Riverside Course. Riverside was always viewed as the more friendly, non-championship course, though it hosted it's share of prestigious tournaments as well. Rees Jones performed major work on both courses through the years and the style of each came to resemble more his architeture than his father's, or Finger's. In 2022, Tripp Davis remodeled Riverside, rebuilding and reshaping each hole, each green site and the bunkers to tie them better into the landforms, creating new looks and several new holes in the process. Davis divided the par-5 third into a short par 3 and a dogleg left par 4 with the new green pushed back against the Chattahoochee River, then combined the old fourth and fifth into a riverside par 5 that bends gradually right. The twelfth green was pushed back 80 yards to turn it into a par 5, the par-3 17th green was rebuilt with modifeid punchbowl shaping and water hazards near the greens at 14 and 18 were removed. Riverside finished second for the 2023 Best Transformation award, and there are some (including us) who would divide a 10-round split between Highlands and Riverside 5-5, or even 6-4 in favor or the latter.
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Hawks Ridge Golf Club
Private
Hawks Ridge Golf Club
Ball Ground, GA
4.2
69 Panelists
About an hour north of Atlanta, Hawks Ridge is a Bob Cupp design that opened in 1999. Not unlike the terrain at Augusta National, Hawks Ridge has dramatic elevation changes as it plays among the towering pines. Known as a "players" club, it's full of accomplished sticks and there's no shortage of high-stakes money games at any given moment. Some members fly in by helicopter. Standout holes include the par-4 second with a second shot that must avoid the lake banked against the green's edge, the big par-3 fourth with an enormous tilted green and the par-4 11th that plays to a left-to-right banked fairway, then uphill to a blind, benched green. The par-4 fifth must also be noted--it's a drivable par-4 playing downhill off a ridge to a shallow green sandwiched between bunkers and a creek. Do you dare?
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The River Club
Private
The River Club
Suwanee, GA
4.2
41 Panelists
The River Club in Suwanee is ranked as one of the best golf courses in Georgia. Discover our experts reviews and tee time information
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Atlanta Country Club
Private
Atlanta Country Club
Marietta, GA
4.2
147 Panelists
For over a decade, the most spirited debate in golf was over who really designed the really fine Atlanta Country Club. Both Willard Byrd of Atlanta and Joseph S. Finger of Houston claimed the honor. Both lobbied Golf Digest hard for the architectural credit, but neither provided much supporting documentation. Both architects are deceased now, and from what we can piece together, Byrd landed the original contract in the early 1960s, but was still more land-planner than course architect in those days, so the club brought in Finger to finish the job. We give them both credit for this hilly, strategic design, a solution neither architect would likely have accepted. Atlanta resident and former Jack Nicklaus associate Mike Riley remodeled the course in the early 2000s and his work helped put the course back in the America's 100 Greatest Courses ranking in 2003 after it had fallen off in 1997. Now architect Beau Welling is working with the club, and the results of his renovation will be revealed in late 2023 or early 2024.
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Ansley Golf Club: Settindown Creek
3.9
51 Panelists
The late architect Bob Cupp, an elite golfer in his youth, was extremely talented at building tournament-worthy golf courses. Settindown Creek, the "country" course of the intown Ansley Golf Club located in the suburbs far north of Atlanta, is no exception (see the slope of 150). The club has hosted a number of prominent state and national events, including the 2005 U.S. Women's Amateur won by Morgan Pressel. It's a tough course that requires controlled approaches into greens surrounded by creeks, ponds, penal bunkers and deep rough. Two thirds of the holes play through the flood plain of the Little River, the other third over typically hilly, wooded north Georgia terrain. The original plan for the course had the holes numbered differently. The property straddled the county line, with most of the course on the Cherokee County side. At the time, however, Cherokee was a dry county, so the club moved the location of the clubhouse across the line into the smaller (and wetter) Fulton County section, necessitating a reording of the holes and turning, unfortunately, one of the course's weakest holes into the current 18th.
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The Standard Club: Standard
Private
The Standard Club: Standard
Johns Creek, GA
3.8
33 Panelists
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Country Club of the South: South
Private
Country Club of the South: South
Johns Creek, GA
3.2
13 Panelists
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Dunwoody Country Club
Private
Dunwoody Country Club
Atlanta, GA
3.1
34 Panelists
Dunwoody is an example of the benefits of smart renovation. The club was established in the 1960s in the countryside north of Atlanta as the suburbs were quickly expanding that direction. It was a nice neighborhood country club with a perfectly fine course designed by Willard Byrd, who was one of the top regional architects working in the southeast in the 1960s and 70s. Over time, like all courses, the trees thickened and the golf features dulled, making the golf ordinary. Enter Atlanta-based architect Bill Bergin, who remodeled the course in 2013 by thinning excessive trees, expanding putting surfaces, creating more room in the fairways and giving the bunkering a more distinctive look with vertical grass faces and strong horizontal top lines. Though he couldn't cure the awkwardness of the unfortunate fifth hole, a 6-iron/8-iron par 4 that bends 90-degrees right, his work breathed new life into the wonderful, rolling piece of land with a kind of centralized core routing that later became increasingly rare in the Atlanta market. Once sleepy, Dunwoody Country Club is now a sleeper and well worth seeking out when in the region.
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Capital City Club: Brookhaven
Private
Capital City Club: Brookhaven
Atlanta, GA
2.6
25 Panelists
Brookhaven is the club's "city" course, though when it was built by architect H.H. Barker in the early 20th centrury it was far out in the country. The city has grown up around it and playing here is a pleasant juxtaposition of green-grass nature and town with the high-rises of nearby Buckhead and the upscale Brookhave neightborhood on display from various points on the course. The golf is fitted onto a tight property and has seen its fair share of renovation and remodels over the decades, with the most recent in 2009 when Bob Cupp rebuilt and re-engineered the course with new holes, a new routing and a new look, somehow finding space for a large new driving range and room for continual clubhouse and amenity expansion. Brookhaven is a fun shotmaker's course with sporty, creatively contoured greens, great variety for such a small footprint, and a wonderful setup run from the par-5 12th through the par-4 15th. The exaggerated bi-level green at the eighth, however, continues to be a source of controversy.
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