How He Hit ThatJune 19, 2017

Steal Brooks Koepka's setup to get the most out of your swing

Keeping an athletic posture through the whole swing is the answer
HARTFORD, WI - JUNE 18:  Brooks Koepka of the United States plays his shot from the 18th tee during the final round of the 2017 U.S. Open at Erin Hills on June 18, 2017 in Hartford, Wisconsin.  (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
Jamie SquireHARTFORD, WI - JUNE 18: Brooks Koepka of the United States plays his shot from the 18th tee during the final round of the 2017 U.S. Open at Erin Hills on June 18, 2017 in Hartford, Wisconsin. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)

Let's just get this out of the way up front. You're never going to swing it 122 miles per hour with the driver like Brooks Koepka.

But Koepka did far more than beat Erin Hills into submission with his power. The muscular Floridian hit 82 percent of his fairways and 86 percent of his greens to put on a ball-striking display en route to a four-shot win.

No matter how fast (or slow) you swing, you can transmit more of your clubhead speed into the ball consistently with a better setup and posture. "What's cool about Brooks Koepka is he kills the ball without overswinging," says top Maryland teacher Bernie Najar. "He takes it back just far enough, and then just smashes it, but while staying in control. He's positioned himself to get the most out of his elastic energy."

It starts with his setup, Najar says. "A lot of players get into bad posture, with a slouched upper body and pressure back on their heels," says Najar, who is based at Caves Valley Golf Club in Owings Mills. "If Brooks didn't have a club in his hand, he'd be ready to play any other sport. He's on the balls of his feet, and he's ready to move. He's the prototype of the modern golfer."

Related: Brooks Koepka Swing Sequence

During the swing, Koepka maintains his athletic posture and relationship between his upper and lower body--which lets him slam into the back of the ball with a very stable clubhead. "His body can support that tremendous speed he's producing," says Najar. "He has great body motion, and his swing is so predictable. A lot of players, when they try to really hit it hard, they have to make a much longer backswing or slap at it through impact--which can close the face. He just hits these relentless long, bullet cuts time after time. Long and straight is perfect for the U.S. Open."