Missing LinksJanuary 9, 2016

Jason Day's own tough act to follow: 'To get back to No. 1'

Stories of interest you might have missed…

“Jordan Spieth isn't the only player with a tough act to follow,” Doug Ferguson of the Associated Press writes. “Jason Day is coming off a monster year of his own with five victories, including his first major at the PGA Championship and a pair of FedEx Cup playoff events that gave him a brief spell at No. 1 in the world. His goal for 2016 is more of the same. A lot more. ‘I'm very motivated to get back to No. 1,’ Day said Wednesday. I'm very motivated to win as many tournaments as I can this year, and to be a more dominant player.’”

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Brooks Koepka took a circuitous route to the PGA Tour, but he arrived ready for prime time, is now 16th in the World Ranking, and, Rickie Fowler said in this profile by Steve DiMeglio of USA Today, “I definitely believe he can be the next big thing…I feel like his game is similar to Dustin (Johnson). He’s powerful, he can attack golf courses, he makes a lot of birdies.”

“Most professional golfers measure success in terms of how many tournaments or how much money they've won. LPGA star Morgan Pressel measures hers in terms of how many lives she's helped save,” Steve Waters of the Sun Sentinel writes in this look at the remarkable work the Morgan Pressel Foundation has done.

“The country that invented the game is in crisis,” the headline to this Scottish Daily Mail story by Calum Crowe reads in part. Crowe is writing about the dearth of quality young players from Scotland. “We have nobody — not one solitary player — in his 20s currently on Tour. Contrast that to our neighbours in England, who can boast 13 players in the top 100 of the world. Yes, they are a bigger country, but the fact that six of those 13 players are in their 20s points to something more than just sheer weight of numbers. By any estimations, there is a monumental generation gap in our game, magnified further by the fact that we are supposed to be the Home of Golf.”