Missing LinksApril 20, 2016

Chambers Bay wants another U.S. Open on greens now described as ‘awesome’

Stories of interest you might have missed…

The greens at Chambers Bay for the U.S. Open last summer were likened to broccoli (Henrik Stenson) and cauliflower (Rory McIlroy), both good for you, but not as putting surfaces. Now? “The greens were awesome,” University of Washington golf coach Matt Thurmond said after a recent tournament there. Craig Smith in the Seattle Times reflects on the year past and examines the region’s bid to bring the Open back to Chambers Bay.

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Dustin Johnson, on the 18th green and 72nd hole of the 2015 U.S. Open at Chambers Bay.

“Charley Hull has a gleaming sponsored BMW X3 sitting on the driveway at home and her own dedicated parking space at Woburn Golf Club. Just one problem: she doesn’t drive. ‘I’m absolutely rubbish at exams,’ said the 20-year-old from Kettering. ‘I’m about to sit my driving theory test and just the thought of it makes me nervous.’ That’s classic Charley, the most unpretentious sporting star you could wish to meet,” Derek Lawrenson writes in the Daily Mail is in this profile of the English star who might not drive, but is driven. “There’s only one place I want to be eventually, and that’s No 1,” she said.

“White boiler suits are a uniform of honest toil, but wearing one at Augusta National comes with a distinct perk. The unmistakeable overalls are the traditional garb of Augusta's caddies. ‘It can be pretty uncomfortable and pretty hot,’ Billy Foster, Lee Westwood’s caddie, said. ‘It's thicker than they look on TV, like a painter and decorator's suit. I'd rather wear my own shorts, but it makes Augusta what it is, I suppose,’” Rod Hodgetts of CNN writes in this look at the Masters from a caddie’s perspective, including how Seve Ballesteros fired him.

When Lucas Glover bogeyed the final hole of the web.com Tour Championship last year, it was enough to bump Rob Oppenheim from 13th to 12th place, which proved enough to get him a PGA Tour card after “13 years of toil,” Sean Martin of PGATour.com writes in this profile of a mini-tour player’s remarkable perseverance.


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