My Usual GameNovember 5, 2016

Back-roads Scotland: A rapid-fire round at Tain Golf Club

Tain is an Old Tom Morris layout on southern side of Dornoch Firth. It's less than five miles in a straight line from Royal Dornoch, and less than ten miles by car. I played it in 1992, on my first golf trip to Scotland. Jerry Quinlan, of Celtic Golf, who planned my trip, had arranged for me to play with the club's general manager and one of the members. I got lost in the town and didn't arrive at the club until exactly eight, when we were supposed to tee off. Here's where I got lost:

The manager, whose name was Norman, and the member, whose name was Ian, were already on the tee when I pulled up. Ian looked peeved and impatient. I jumped from my car, pulled on my shoes, breathlessly hit a drive without a practice swing or a waggle, and took off after them.

Tain, second hole.

Norman and Ian, it turned out, where playing in a club competition. Even so, they played at a pace that would have staggered the average American golfer. I have friends at home who think I play ridiculously fast, but I had to concentrate to keep up. I watched them closely, to make sure I put down my bag on the side of the green that was nearest the next tee, and I always had to be aware of whose turn it was to do what. No plumb-bobbing!

Tain, third hole.

If there was any doubt about the playing order, one of them would quickly establish it. "First David, then myself, then Ian," Norman said on one hole as he pulled the pin. Each golfer was expected to line up his putt or select his next club while the others were putting or hitting. Even so, we played more slowly than the two players behind us, who occasionally had to wait.

Tain, eighth hole.

Tain is surrounded by farms and separated from Dornoch Firth by fields full of sheep; at one point, I had to retrieve my ball from a pigpen, which was out of bounds. Still, my round was one of the happiest of my trip. After I had jogged along with Norman and Ian for a couple of holes, they apparently forgave me for being late, and from then on we chatted between shots. Norman told me where to aim on every tee -- the bunker on the left, the last tree on the right -- and I manged to hit my ball on the proper line surprisingly often. Later, it occurred to me that my unaccustomed accuracy was probably the result of my aiming at something. Before that day, I don't think I had ever aimed a drive at anything smaller than the entire fairway -- in effect, aiming at nothing.

Tain, seventeenth hole.

After our round, Norman and Ian bought me a beer in the clubhouse bar. The two players who had been behind us were also there. Ian good-naturedly complained to them that they had talked too loudly during their match, and that their voices had bothered him. "If you had been playing at the proper pace," one of them said, "you would have been too far ahead to hear me."

Tain, tenth hole.

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