Golf Digest editors picks
80. CHAD CAMPBELL

80. CHAD CAMPBELL

Score: 3.780 | Seasons: 2003-07 | Best season: 7.622 (2003) | Stroke differential: 0.648
Showed tremendous promise in '03 with a trio of seconds, including one at the PGA Championship, then became the first to make the Tour Championship his debut title. He captured the '04 Bay Hill by six shots over No. 66 Stuart Appleby only nine starts later, but has won just twice in his last 99 eligible starts. Subsequent playoff losses at the '09 Masters and the Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals Open helped him to a 50th finish in that year's FedEx Cup standings, but since '10 he has cracked the top 10 just seven times in 109 events.
79. NICK WATNEY

79. NICK WATNEY

Score: 3.793 | Seasons: 2006-13 | Best season: 9.450 (2011) | Stroke differential: 0.760
Began eligibility with six top 10s in his second full season in '06, then capitalized at the '07 New Orleans in his 85th career start, days before his 26th birthday. Progressively more prominent wins followed: '09 Buick Invitational, '11 WGC-Cadillac and AT&T National and the '12 Barclays as the opening leg of the FedEx Cup playoffs. He nearly caught No. 61 Zach Johnson in another playoff event, the '13 BMW Championship, which helped him reach a fifth consecutive Tour Championship despite placing outside the top 25 or missing the cut in 16 of his 26 events in the regular season.
78. JOHN MAHAFFEY

78. JOHN MAHAFFEY

Score: 3.795 | Seasons: 1980-89 | Best season: 8.000 (1985) | Stroke differential: 1.124
The '78 PGA represented the second of 10 career victories, four of which were registered before these calculations began in '80. He took both the '84 Bob Hope and '85 Texas Open in two-hole playoffs, then nabbed a one-shot win over No. 60 Larry Mize for the '86 Players. At that point he had won in seven of nine seasons and closed with the '89 St. Jude, but never came close to duplicating his '78 PGA success in majors, with only one other top 10.
77. JOHN COOK

77. JOHN COOK

Score: 3.808 | Seasons: 1981-2001 | Best season: 12.435 (1992) | Stroke differential: 0.822
Cook prevailed from a five-way scrum, which included No. 35 Hale Irwin and No. 36 Ben Crenshaw, to capture his first victory at the '81 Bing Crosby. Two years later, he topped No. 63 Johnny Miller in a six-hole playoff at the '83 Canadian Open. In '92 he won two of his first three starts, finished second in the British Open and PGA and added a Las Vegas Invitational crown in October. Torn labrum and right-shoulder cysts forced '03 surgery and he placed in the top 25 only 11 times in his last 82 career starts.
76. STEPHEN AMES

76. STEPHEN AMES

Score: 3.822 | Seasons: 2004-09 | Best season: 6.206 (2004) | Stroke differential: 0.983
Only four wins in 142 eligible starts but interestingly never placed second in that stretch, although he was runner-up to Craig Perks in the pre-eligibility '02 Players. He broke through at the '04 Western Open and then in the '06 Players by six over No. 17 Retief Goosen. On the second-toughest closing day in the tournament's history, his 67 bettered the field average by 8.378 shots. It's not surprising, then, that he is one of 13 players in the Modern 100 with a higher final-round stroke differential (1.045) than all rounds.
75. BUBBA WATSON

75. BUBBA WATSON

Score: 3.875 | Seasons: 2007-13 | Best season: 11.401 (2012) | Stroke differential: 0.737
His '12 season, fueled by a memorable Masters playoff triumph, earns 97th-highest point total and represents the third-highest season produced by a player in the second 50. Two of his other three titles were FedEx Cup playoffs victories, too, although he dropped a three-hole playoff with Martin Kaymer for the '10 PGA. He'd be higher on the list were it not for his 88th-ranked final-round stroke differential (0.467), and his high missed-cut percentage (45 of 163 starts, 27.6), which is better than only seven other players.
74. JOHN HUSTON

74. JOHN HUSTON

Score: 3.960 | Seasons: 1990-2003 | Best season: 8.655 (1998) | Stroke differential: 0.812
His score of 3.942 is closest to the average point total of the 1,945 individual seasons crunched in this project. He was hardly average in some of his seven victories, however, beginning with breaking the 43-year-old tour record shared by Ben Hogan and Mike Souchak for lowest 72-hole total ('98 Hawaiian Open: 63-65-66-66). His low final-round stroke differential (0.510) minimizes some low numbers to win, such as a 62 at Disney World in '92.
73. BRANDT SNEDEKER

73. BRANDT SNEDEKER

Score: 3.968 | Seasons: 2007-13 | Best season: 8.575 (2013) | Stroke differential: 0.895
The '07 tour rookie-of-the-year recipient announced his presence with a course-record 61 at Torrey Pines North, a third to No. 1 Tiger Woods at that year's Buick Invitational, then a Wyndham victory in the last event before the playoffs. He topped No. 25 Luke Donald in two extra holes at the '11 Heritage and has won twice in each of his last two seasons, notably the '12 Tour Championship by three shots. He has also become less erratic in majors, where he missed eight of his first 15 cuts, by tying for third in the '12 Open Championship and sixth in the '13 Masters.
72. JAY HAAS

72. JAY HAAS

Score: 3.989 | Seasons: 1980-93 | Best season: 6.807 (1982) | Stroke differential: 0.975
Already a proven competitor with a '78 Andy Williams victory, he posted early consecutive multiple-win seasons in '81 and '82. His final victory at the '93 Texas Open pushed him to 3-0 in playoffs. Although he collected major top-10s all but one year from '82-87, he actually saw more success in those four events after '93. His career-best thirds came in the '95 U.S. Open and '99 PGA as he played another 12 seasons to moderate success after his eligibility ended.
71. MARK MCCUMBER

71. MARK MCCUMBER

Score: 4.046 | Seasons: 1980-94 | Best season: 9.910 (1994) | Stroke differential: 0.858
The memory of his '88 hometown Players Championship triumph by four shots -- then the event's second-widest margin -- obscures two Western Opens ('83, '89) and a stellar '94 season. That year he collected a second Anheuser-Busch, the Hardee's and a Tour Championship playoff over No. 39 Fuzzy Zoeller. A spinal-cord lesion diagnosed in '96, which doctors thought might have developed the previous year, abruptly curtailed his career: His last top 10 came two weeks after finishing second to No. 29 Tom Lehman in the '96 Open Championship.
70. K.J. CHOI

70. K.J. CHOI

Score: 4.053 | Seasons: 2001-11 | Best season: 8.559 (2007) | Stroke differential: 0.907
One of two Asians in the Modern 100 (No. 96 Shigeki Maruyama is the other), Choi drew global attention in '02 for his victory at the Compaq New Orleans, becoming the circuit's first South Korean champ and fourth Asian. A solid '07 saw him prevail at the Memorial and AT&T National en route to seven top 10s that year. His playoff victory over No. 40 David Toms at the '11 Players concluded a run of four starts no worse than a tie for eighth at the Masters, his third top 10 at Augusta National.
69. SCOTT SIMPSON

69. SCOTT SIMPSON

Score: 4.054 | Seasons: 1980-98 | Best season: 8.137 (1987) | Stroke differential: 0.893
Survived a showdown of Californians at Olympic Club to edge No. 7 Tom Watson for the '87 U.S. Open, and nearly added a second in '91 but bowed in an 18-hole playoff at Hazeltine National to No. 23 Payne Stewart. His first victory, well-timed considering this formula, was the '80 Western Open by five-shots over No. 24 Andy Bean. Simpson's last title, the '98 Buick Invitational, doubled as the third triumph by a San Diegan at Torrey Pines in six years.
68. SCOTT VERPLANK

68. SCOTT VERPLANK

Score: 4.084 | Seasons: 1985-2007 | Best season: 6.953 (2001) | Stroke differential: 0.720
The namesake for the Scott Verplank Rule, which, thanks to his '85 Western Open title, decrees that victories by amateurs count as bonus starts in their first point-accruing pro season. In the decade beginning with that '88 eligibility, he had three negative-point seasons and four more eliminated due to injury considerations. In his last 10 years, however, he won three events and in seven years bettered the Modern 100 season-point average of 3.942. A Dallas resident, his sentimental last victory at the '07 Byron Nelson occurred eight months after Nelson's death.
67. JASON DUFNER

67. JASON DUFNER

Score: 4.104 | Seasons: 2009-13 | Best season: 9.411 (2012) | Stroke differential: 0.829
Rebounded from his disappointing loss at the '11 Phoenix and PGA Championship playoffs, the latter to Keegan Bradley, by winning three times in 29 stroke-play events. Dufner's run began by topping No. 6 Ernie Els at '12 Zurich Classic of New Orleans and continued four weeks later at the HP Byron Nelson. He concluded his fifth season of eligibility with his first major victory, the '13 PGA Championship, by two shots over No. 13 Jim Furyk, and has finished tied for fourth in the last two U.S. Opens.
66. STUART APPLEBY

66. STUART APPLEBY

Score: 4.125 | Seasons: 1997-2010 | Best season: 6.589 (1997) | Stroke differential: 0.713
Equaled Gene Littler's feat in taking three straight Mercedes Championships ('04-06), the first and last times with No. 5 Vijay Singh as runner-up and the middle time by rallying past Singh's 54-hole lead. He bowed out of a four-way, four-hole aggregate playoff in the '02 British Open captured by No. 6 Ernie Els. His best year on tour was in '97, where he won the Honda Classic. His next best came in '08 (6.509) where, although winless, he finished second in the WGC-Bridgestone, had six other top 10s and missed only two cuts.
65. WAYNE LEVI

65. WAYNE LEVI

Score: 4.182 | Seasons: 1980-90 | Best season: 8.350 (1982) | Stroke differential: 1.025
A little more than half of his 540 career starts are eligible and include the last 10 of his 12 titles. Despite that total his schedule works against him in this formula. He never competed in the British Open and had only sporadic presence at the other three majors, with his best finish a tie for 11th at the '84 Masters. A four-victory '90 ranked as only 20th-best in points that season because of an all-rounds stroke differential of 0.514 and nine missed cuts, including both of his majors and the Players.
64. CHIP BECK

64. CHIP BECK

Score: 4.214 | Seasons: 1983-92 | Best season: 8.305 (1989) | Stroke differential: 1.136
Two of Beck's four wins came in '88, where he also added three seconds and won the Vardon Trophy for his low stroke average (69.46). His all-rounds stroke differential that year was 2.067. Runner-up finishes became more frequent, however, and even his winless '89 saw three of them en route to 15 in his 10 eligible seasons. His 59 at the '91 Las Vegas Invitation was the second in tour history and boasted a 10.516 stroke differential.
63. JOHNNY MILLER

63. JOHNNY MILLER

Score: 4.267 | Seasons: 1980-94 | Best season: 9.325 (1981) | Stroke differential: 1.240
If only the modern era were defined as beginning in '74 (eight wins), or '75 (four), or even '76 (three). Instead of having his entire 25 titles, the 41 percent of his career eligible under this formula accounts for seven wins, five seconds and five thirds in 171 starts. He won five times in '80-83, four of them at celebrity-hosted events, but never ranked higher than sixth in a season's point lineup. He saved his best for last at Pebble Beach, taking the AT&T National Pro-Am in '87 and then a surprising '94 encore.
 62. DARREN CLARKE

62. DARREN CLARKE

Score: 4.447 | Seasons: 2000-11 | Best season: 7.875 (2005) | Stroke differential: 0.933
Only three victories in 86 eligible starts but they carry heft: '00 WGC-Andersen Consulting Match Play over No. 1 Tiger Woods, the '03 WGC-NEC Invitational and the '11 British Open. The last one came 20 years after his debut appearance in the oldest major, but the most recent of his trio of top 10s was a tie for third in '01. His final-round stroke differential (1.073) is 0.140 better than his all-rounds mark, a span trailing only No. 34 José Marîa Olazábal (0.316) and No. 45 Justin Rose (0.227). He's never shot better than 67 to close a week, which points to the difficulty of the scoring conditions he faces.
61. ZACH JOHNSON

61. ZACH JOHNSON

Score: 4.484 | Seasons: 2004-13 | Best season: 7.600 (2009) | Stroke differential: 0.968
One man who hopes the tour never abandons two particular states: seven of his 10 titles through '13 came in Georgia (including the '07 Masters), and Texas. Johnson did not register his second major top 10 until his 23rd start (10th in '09 PGA), by which time he'd missed the cut 12 times in those events. The Modern 100 formula's 50-percent bonus for majors assesses a hefty penalty for a guy who ranks just 26th in overall percentage of missed cuts (17.4).
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